Screaming his innocence

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Monsieur Leland

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,

Do we say " he pins her to the ground while screaming of his innocence"

or "he pins her to the ground while screaming his innocence". (I prefer the version without "of"...)
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    I don't like either very much, and the situation seems odd. Possible alternatives are "... while screaming that he was innocent", or "while screaming about his innocence." Note that these two are not the same.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    "he pins her to the ground while screaming his innocence" :thumbsup:

    (Could you give us the usual source and context?)

    Edit to add: I'm surprised at GWB's not liking the phrasing - the transitive version seems perfectly normal to me:

    A: "He did not seem very happy - what did he say?"
    B: "Oh... he screamed something about his innocence, but I told the guards to execute him anyway - he's rather annoying."
     

    Monsieur Leland

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Yes, I also think "while screaming his innocence" sounds perfectly fine, but a native american speaker who was proofreading my text told me it was wrong.

    I have 50 sentences like this one on which I have a doubt albeit I know they must be correct. Yeah, it is kind of shizophrenic.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    Some examples from Google Ngram Viewer - Click

    The toothless sumbitch was screaming his demand directly into my right ear. - Gods Go Begging - Page 34
    Gods Go Begging
    Alfredo Véa - 1999

    Frantically the dragon tried to shake his wing loose, screaming his fury over and over into the cavernous barn. -> Sailing to Sarantium - Page 35
    https://books.google.co.uk/books?isbn=0670880930



    https://books.google.co.uk/books?isbn=0786006587
    Zachary Alan Fox - 1999 -
    Out of control, needing to break something, kill something, he raced back into the restaurant and picked up the first thing he saw, a sledgehammer resting against a counter, and flung it against the wall, screaming his rage at ...
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Yes, it's OK stand-alone, maybe more context would explain why the person found it an error (I can think of contexts where it would sound wrong).
     

    Monsieur Leland

    Senior Member
    French - France
    The context is very simple: a man is accused of having done something wrong by a woman, and throws himself on her while screaming his innocence.
     
    Last edited:

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would either use "screaming his innocence" or I would demonstrate it:

    He threw her to the ground, pinned her down and screamed, "I didn't do it! I'm innocent! I'm innocent I tell you! I'm innocent!"
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It's rather ironic in context, then, Monsieur Leland. Because throwing yourself on someone and screaming in response to an accusation is itself doing something wrong! So he's not helping his cause (rather the reverse) by this action.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It's rather ironic in context, then, Monsieur Leland. Because throwing yourself on someone and screaming in response to an accusation is itself doing something wrong! So he's not helping his cause (rather the reverse) by this action.
    I thought about adding to my suggestion but I thought it might confuse:

    He threw her to the ground, pinned her down and screamed, "I didn't do it! I'm innocent! I'm innocent I tell you! I'm innocent!" All the while repeatedly driving his Kabar knife into her chest. :eek:


    A Kabar knife:
     
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