Screams/screaming

taraa

Senior Member
Persian
In the movie "the secret of kells" sometimes it writes "screams" sometimes "screaming" when someone screams. What is their difference?
 
  • Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    I think it's the basic difference between the simple (indefinite) and continuous (progressive) aspects.

    Simple aspect: "screams" - the action is completed.
    Continuous aspect: "screaming" - the action is in progress (not completed).
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    I think it's the basic difference between the simple (indefinite) and continuous (progressive) aspects.

    Simple aspect: "screams" - the action is completed.
    Continuous aspect: "screaming" - the action is in progress (not completed).
    Thank you very much :)
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In the movie "the secret of kells" sometimes it writes "screams" sometimes "screaming" when someone screams. What is their difference?
    Please remember that we always plead for complete sentences so that our answers will be correct.

    For example, I cannot be sure whether you're talking about verbs or nouns.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Without context this is pure speculation, but "screams" may mean a wordless scream ("Eeeeeeeee!"), and "screaming" may mean that the person screams some words ("Watch out!")
     

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    This only seems to make sense if it is captions, or closed captions, used to inform the deaf or hard of hearing about non-speech sounds in a movie or video. ("Subtitles" normally refers only to transcriptions or translations of spoken dialogue, but "captions" normally include a description of non-speech sounds.)
    If that is the case, I'd say there is no difference between "screams" or "screaming".
     

    taraa

    Senior Member
    Persian
    Please remember that we always plead for complete sentences so that our answers will be correct.

    For example, I cannot be sure whether you're talking about verbs or nouns.
    Thanks a lot!
    But there is no complete sentence. in its subtitle it show "screams" when a person screams then another person fall down of a scaffolding and screams but this times it writes "screaming".
    Without context this is pure speculation, but "screams" may mean a wordless scream ("Eeeeeeeee!"), and "screaming" may mean that the person screams some words ("Watch out!")
    Thanks a lot!
    in both of them two persons don't say any words just wordless scream
    This only seems to make sense if it is captions, or closed captions, used to inform the deaf or hard of hearing about non-speech sounds in a movie or video. ("Subtitles" normally refers only to transcriptions or translations of spoken dialogue, but "captions" normally include a description of non-speech sounds.)
    If that is the case, I'd say there is no difference between "screams" or "screaming".
    Thanks a lot!
    I don't know the difference between "caption" and "subtitle". But it's not for deaf or hard of hearings. In its subtitle it show all the wordless and non wordless sounds (squawks, grunts, bleating...)
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top