screw/bolt vs. Schraube/Bolzen

brian

Senior Member
AmE (New Orleans)
Hi everyone,

There is a pretty big debate concerning the difference(s) between a screw and a bolt. Let's assume for simplicity (based on the Wikipedia article), however, that a bolt is intended to be tightened or released by torquing a nut ("Mutter"), and a screw is intended to be tightened or released by torquing the head.

Now I'm wondering: is there such a distinction in German between Schraube ("screw") and Bolzen ("bolt")?

The reason I ask is that I've been searching in some technical dictionaries for the names of specific types of bolts, e.g. jack bolt, anchor bolt, carriage bolt, etc., and the results contain -schraube and not -bolzen, e.g. Abdrückschraube ("jack bolt"), Ankerschraube ("anchor bolt"), and Flachrundschraube mit Vierkantansatz ("carriage bolt").

It's important for me to distinguish in English between screw and bolt, so I'm wondering if I can make those same distinctions when I translate into German, by always choosing screw = Schraube, bolt = Bolzen.

What do you think?

P.S. Some people consider screw to be more generic, i.e. a bolt is a specific kind of screw.
 
Last edited:
  • berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    screw = Schraube, bolt = Bolzen is correct. But colloquially you use Schraube for both. Professionals regularly complain but people (including myself) keep doing that.:D
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Yeah, the problem is similar in English--you can see carriage bolt or carriage screw.

    I wouldn't have a problem saying screw = Schraube, bolt = Bolzen, except for the fact that in all the dictionaries I've looked in, every specific kind of bolt is called a Whatever-schraube.

    So I don't want to call a an anchor bolt an Ankerbolzen if everyone knows it as and calls it an Ankerschraube, you know?

    What a mess! :)
     

    Robocop

    Senior Member
    (Swiss) German
    Now I'm wondering: is there such a distinction in German between Schraube ("screw") and Bolzen ("bolt")?
    No, there is none and besides, a Bolzen is something completely different (it is not a Schraube).
    In German, a bolt is plainly called Schraube (like screw) or more specifically Gewindeschraube or Zylinderschraube or Bolzenschraube.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    No, there is none and besides, a Bolzen is something completely different (it is not a Schraube).
    In German, a bolt is plainly called Schraube (like screw) or more specifically Gewindeschraube or Zylinderschraube.
    Ich glaube, Du irrst dich. Der korrekte Ausdruck für das, dass wir vulgo Schraube nennen ist "Gewindebolzen". Eine Schraube ist etwas, was man in ein Material (Holz, Spanplatten, Blech) hineindreht. Ich bin schon von Profis getadelt worden, weil ich einen Gewindebolzen fälschlich als Schraube bezeichnet habe.

    PS: Ich habe noch etwas gesucht und folgendes gefunden: Es gibt wohl auch den Ausdruck "Gewindeschraube", die sich von einer "Schraube" wie ein "Gewindebolzen" oder "Gewindestift" unterscheidet aber einen Kopf hat.
     
    Last edited:

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    Well, I've just been told that in our documentation we're going to simply call all bolts and screws bolts (which I disagree with, but whatever), so in my translations I'll just call them all Schrauben.

    That's called simplification. :cool:
     

    Baranxi

    Member
    German (Munich vernacular)
    Ich glaube, Du irrst dich. Der korrekte Ausdruck für das, dass wir vulgo Schraube nennen ist "Gewindebolzen". Eine Schraube ist etwas, was man in ein Material (Holz, Spanplatten, Blech) hineindreht. Ich bin schon von Profis getadelt worden, weil ich einen Gewindebolzen fälschlich als Schraube bezeichnet habe.
    Interessant, denn ich habe ein Glossar vor mir, dass "screw" als "Schraube" oder genauer "Einziehschraube" übersetzt, "bolt" dagegen ebenfalls als "Schraube" bzw. "Durchsteckschraube".
     

    Robocop

    Senior Member
    (Swiss) German
    Interessant, denn ich habe ein Glossar vor mir, dass "screw" als "Schraube" oder genauer "Einziehschraube" übersetzt, "bolt" dagegen ebenfalls als "Schraube" bzw. "Durchsteckschraube".
    Genau, und so ist es ja auch: "screws" werden eingedreht und "bolts" werden durchgesteckt und mittels Mutter festgezogen.

    Ich glaube, Du irrst dich. Der korrekte Ausdruck für das, dass wir vulgo Schraube nennen ist "Gewindebolzen". Eine Schraube ist etwas, was man in ein Material (Holz, Spanplatten, Blech) hineindreht. Ich bin schon von Profis getadelt worden, weil ich einen Gewindebolzen fälschlich als Schraube bezeichnet habe.
    Da gebe ich Dir im Prinzip recht. Aber in der Realität wird diese Unterscheidung nicht (bzw. kaum) gemacht. Du brauchst Dir bloss die Schraubensortimente diverser Hersteller/Lieferanten im Internet anzuschauen: Alles, was im Englischen als "bolt" bezeichnet würde, wird da durchs Band als Schraube geführt.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Im deutschen Sprachgebrauch hat ein Bolzen keinen Kopf, während eine "prototypische" Schraube einen Kopf hat. Es gibt aber auch Schrauben ohne Kopf, wie zum Beispiel "Madenschrauben" bzw. "Gewindestifte".

    Bolzen können Gewinde haben. Ein prototypischer Bolzen hat kein Gewinde. Deshalb wurde für Bolzen mit Gewinde der Begriff "Gewindebolzen" geprägt. Bolzen sind in meiner Vorstellung relativ groß.

    Mit "Prototyp" meine ich den "normalen Typ", das, was ich mir ohne weitere Erklärung darunter vorstelle.
    Originally Posted by berndf

    Originally Posted by berndf View Post
    ... Eine Schraube ist etwas, was man in ein Material (Holz, Spanplatten, Blech) hineindreht. Ich bin schon von Profis getadelt worden, weil ich einen Gewindebolzen fälschlich als Schraube bezeichnet habe.
    Ich denke, dass es vom Fachbereich abhängt. Auf jeden Fall wird eine Madenschraube (die ja keinen Kopf hat) in ein Gewinde hineingedreht. Nach dieser Definition ist die Bezeichnung "Schraube" korrekt. Wenn ich es richtig verstehe, kann ein Gewindestift dann Schraube oder Bolzen sein, je nach Anwendung.
    Es gibt auch Schrauben, die im Bereich vor dem Kopf kein Gewinde haben und dann sowohl als "Schraube" als auch als "Bolzen" dienen. Normalerweise bezeichnet man sie trotzdem als Schrauben.

    Die Wikipedia gibt eine Definition an:
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolzen_(Befestigung)
    http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schraube_(Verbindungselement)

    Well, I've just been told that in our documentation we're going to simply call all bolts and screws bolts (which I disagree with, but whatever), so in my translations I'll just call them all Schrauben.

    That's called simplification. :cool:

    I agree as far as I understand your context. As the others already wrote this is not exact but I think it might be exact enough. It depends on "who is your audience?"

    Note: In German this is not possible in the same way to include all "Bolzen" into the set of "Schrauben".
     
    Last edited:

    davidyates

    New Member
    bilingual french/english resident in fr
    Answer may be a bit late, but being a fastener specialist, I felt compelled to respond. You are right in saying that a bolt is tightened by turning a nut and a screw is tightened by turning the head. If the screw screws into wood the term is a carriage screw (often called "carriage bolt"). If the bolt screws into metal (into a tapped hole) the term is "setscrew". The term "bolzenschrauben" in german corresponds to setscrew. Hope this clear things up.
     

    davidyates

    New Member
    bilingual french/english resident in fr
    A tap is a male threaded device which, introduced into a drilled hole, produces a female thread in the hole.
    When translating a document concerning screw threads, my use of the word 'tap' (gewindebohrer) can lead to no confusion, the other meanings being miles away from the subject....
     

    Frieder

    Senior Member
    The term "bolzenschrauben" in german corresponds to setscrew.
    Sorry if I have to disagree. But the Word Bolzenschraube does not exist in German (OK, you'll find it on google, but what does that prove?). When I look up set screw (or setscrew) I find Madenschraube or Befestigungsschraube, Klemmschraube, Feststellschraube.

    There seems to be a lot of confusion here. Just type in set scew in en.wikipedia.org. Then switch to the German version. You'll find a completely different thing.

    If the bolt screws into metal (into a tapped hole) the term is "setscrew".

    What you describe here is simply a Gewindeschraube, in contrast to Holzschraube and Blechschraube.
    de.wikipedia.org states:

    Die pleonastische Handelsbezeichnung Gewindeschraube (jede Schraube hat ein Gewinde) bezeichnet üblicherweise Schrauben mit Gewindeformen, die zur Aufnahme in einem passenden Innengewinde vorgesehen sind, also zum Beispiel Maschinenschrauben mit metrischem oder zölligem Gewinde, aber keine Holz- oder Blechschrauben oder selbstschneidende.
    Further reading: en.wikipedia.org

    The issue of what is a screw and what is a bolt is not completely resolved with Machinery's Handbook distinction, however, because of confounding terms, the ambiguous nature of some parts of the distinction, and usage variations.
    The best answer you can get can be found in post #2.
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    But the Word Bolzenschraube does not exist in German (OK, you'll find it on google,but what does that prove?
    If you follow the links in Google Books, I would say it does prove that the word exists or existed in professional use, e.g. here. Most of these attestation are about military technology and virtually all are pre-WWII (those with more recent publication dates are clearly reprints of older texts). It seems to be an outdated term.

    I agree with you that Gewindeschraube seems to be the most usual German term for a setscrew. But that doesn't necessarily mean the term Bolzenschraube doesn't exist.
    There seems to be a lot of confusion here. Just type in set scew in en.wikipedia.org. Then switch to the German version. You'll find a completely different thing.
    That doesn't tell us much. It wouldn't be the first time, the cross links between the German and English Wikipedia versions produced nonsense.
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    I fear you could debate this topic until kingdom come and you still wouldn't come to a consensus. :)

    There's countless norms that attempt to define everything in the smallest detail, but in actual usage there's very very few people who care about that.
    In my own personal use, being a person with some engineering background, I'd have a seriously hard time calling an M2 hex screw (with or without a nut) a "Gewindebolzen" (and as a native German speaker I wouldn't call it a bolt in English either).

    In simple terms, everything that's small and that has a thread on it is a screw. When it's big (>10mm diameter), I may be inclined to call it "Bolzen". But then again, if it's long and without head, I'd be inclined to call it "Gewindestange".
    But most importantly, I know that others might call it differently, so I just stay openminded and adjust my usage according to the people I'm working with. (marketing-oriented screw supplier vs. norm-oriented engineering staff vs. pragmatic technicians vs. non-technical end-users).

    Thus, if I were faced with this dilemma in the course of some translations, I'd just look at my target audience and I'd adjust my language accordingly.
     
    Top