Scucciamient

kfox

New Member
english
As a child I remember relatives telling we kids that we were being (or "don't be") a (phonetically) "scooch a mense". Think I recall being told that it meant "scorcher" or "pain in the @*#". Can someone tell me if that's true, and how to spell it correctly? Thanks!
 
  • Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    kfox said:
    As a child I remember relatives telling we kids that we were being (or "don't be") a (phonetically) "scooch a mense". Think I recall being told that it meant "scorcher" or "pain in the @*#". Can someone tell me if that's true, and how to spell it correctly? Thanks!
    the bold one is more suitable...

    It seems a dialectal expression
    "Scucciament" that sounds something like "scooch-cha-meant"
    what a bore you are...
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    alfry said:
    It seems a dialectal expression
    "Scucciament" that sounds something like "scooch-cha-meant"
    what a :cross:bore:cross: :tick:bother:tick: you are...
    I think nowadays it's better the word bother than bore, I might be wrong, though.

    Bore = someone who's boring, something that's boring
    Bother = a nuisance, something or someone annoying

    What do you think?

    Scocciamento doesn't exist in Italian, though it might be used... (you know when someone's really bothered can say anything :D), the correct word is scocciatura.
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    silviap said:
    I think nowadays it's better the word bother than bore, I might be wrong, though.

    Bore = someone who's boring, something that's boring
    Bother = a nuisance, something or someone annoying

    What do you think?

    Scocciamento doesn't exist in Italian, though it might be used... (you know when someone's really bothered can say anything :D), the correct word is scocciatura.
    ovviamente è dialetto, e precisamente è 'Scucciament' con l'ultima e lunga oppure 'Scucciamient', dipende da dove ti trovi.

    'what a bore you are' è un'espressione che un americano, ai tempi della tesi, mi rivolgeva spessissimo (chissà come mai vi starete chiedendo?)

    Son curioso di sapere che ne pensano i nostri amici madrelingua ;)
     

    leenico

    Senior Member
    U.S.A. english
    which would you use (bore or bother) in this expression?

    what a bore/bother you are...
    I don't know what scucciament means. I can't find it in the dictionary. Bore=Noìa. If you want to say the person is boring use that. Bother=Fastidio. If you want to say the person is annoying use that.
     

    Alfry

    Senior Member
    Italian
    leenico said:
    I don't know what scucciament means. I can't find it in the dictionary. Bore=Noìa. If you want to say the person is boring use that. Bother=Fastidio. If you want to say the person is annoying use that.
    Ok, you answered my question, thanks
    :)

    scocciatore = pest, pain in the ...

    sei un vero scocciatore, lasciami in pace = you're a real pest, leave me alone!.
     

    lsp

    Senior Member
    NY
    US, English
    A bore wouldn't get this king of annoyed (amico falso, attenzione) response, so I would say "bother."

    A boor might, though (a crude uncouth ill-bred person lacking culture or refinement, per HYPERDICTIONARY.com), but that's a very grown-up word. :)
     

    kfox

    New Member
    english
    Thanks for your help everyone. The closest suggestion I've read so far to what I am attempting to spell phonetically would be "scucciament" (relatives used to pronounce it as though it would have an "a" or "e" on the end though), but when I type that in and run a search it comes back "no translation found", so I can't tell if the meaning is appropriate.
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    As you've been told already, scocciamento (which you won't find anywhere I guess) means bother.

    What a bother you are!!! That's what they were saying I guess.
     

    kfox

    New Member
    english
    Thank you, silviap. Sounds close enough. My reason for asking in the first place is that my cousin is a Naval Officer and has been stationed in Italy for the past year. Recently, his third child was born; after two boys he is now the father of a girl. I want to remind him of what our grandmother used to say ~ and that he'd better fasten his seatbelt because this is going to be a ride unlike the one he and his wife have taken with their sons! Just didn't want to sound like an idiot by spelling the word wrong. (Or, worse yet, say anything vulgar or crass about his new baby!)
     

    Silvia

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Well, as long as it is said in a fun way... in any other context it'd be rude, and anyway it's not proper Italian, it's dialect.
     

    babysnakes

    New Member
    USA - English
    Hey, I remember my own grandmother using a phrase like that when we were bothering her too. To this day, when someone is a pain in the neck, we call them a "skooch"!
     
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