scupper/ruin/spoil

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kansi

Senior Member
japanese
The coronavirus lockdown has scuppered the wedding plans of many this spring - but two children were determined not to let the pandemic get in the way of their parents tying the knot.
The coronavirus lockdown has ruined the wedding plans of many this spring - but two children were determined not to let the pandemic get in the way of their parents tying the knot.
The coronavirus lockdown has spoiled the wedding plans of many this spring - but two children were determined not to let the pandemic get in the way of their parents tying the knot.

Couple forced to cancel dream wedding due to coronavirus tie the knot after kids hold surprise garden ceremony

Do these sentences mean same?
What's the difference in meaning or nuance between scupper and ruin and spoil ?
I heard scupper sounds informal.
 
  • Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    I've never heard 'scupper' as a verb; I see that it is listed in the WR dictionaries as British and as 'military, informal.'
    The equivalent I know in AmE is 'scuttle,' which the WR dictionaries list as a naval term.
    'Scuttle' as in 'sink deliberately' or 'destroy' and 'scuttle' as in 'scurry' are homonyms.

    For what it's worth, 'scuttle' is definitely an informal term -- not impolite, just informal.
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    I've never heard 'scupper' as a verb; I see that it is listed in the WR dictionaries as British and as 'military, informal.'
    The equivalent I know in AmE is 'scuttle,' which the WR dictionaries list as a naval term.
    'Scuttle' as in 'sink deliberately' or 'destroy' and 'scuttle' as in 'scurry' are homonyms.

    For what it's worth, 'scuttle' is definitely an informal term -- not impolite, just informal.
    okay..scuttle /ruin /spoil all have the same meaning?
     

    kansi

    Senior Member
    japanese
    one person with stuffed parrot and an eye patch.
    I have no idea what this person represent.

    And also scupper according to heypresto's #3.
    So scupper and scuttle are not impolite but informal words to mean spoil or ruin.

    May I ask if spoil and ruin in the example sentences have the same meaning?
     
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