1. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    In an excerpt from a French play, I came across the line:

    Je me foutais de l'argent.

    The word is glossed on the page and defined like this:

    se fouter de = se moquer de

    I can't find "fouter" so I'm wondering if it's a typo?? Is it supposed to be "foutre"? Does that work for "se moquer de"?

    Merci d'avance!
     
  2. Staarkali

    Staarkali Senior Member

    se foutre not se fouter

    Yeah se foutre is se moquer; see also, se ficher (as in je m'en fiche) and s'en contrefoutre
     
  3. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    OK, great. Merci mille fois!
     
  4. Maurice92 Senior Member

    France
    France french
    Caution : the inititial meaning of foutre is very rough.
    Nowadays almost nobody knows the initial meaning, but even with the actual meaning , you must use it with some caution depending on the hearing
    As a matter of fact, it is as the word "fuck" in english : same initial meaning, same current use now
     
  5. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    Returning to this thread. Can someone give me some examples of how "se foutre de" will clearly mean "se moquer de"? Je me fous de toi? (I'm making fun of you?) Il s'est foutu de moi? (He made fun of me?)

    I don't want to use this in a way that will come across as vulgar -- now that I mention it, I'm not really sure how to use "se foutre de" in a vulgar way.

    Thanks!
     
  6. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    « Je me fous de toi » could mean either :
    1) I'm taking the piss out of you
    2) I don't care a damn about you
    Once more, it depends on the context. If you want to make it clear that you mean « se moquer », you could say : « je me fous de ta gueule ». (more polite : « j'me paye ta tête/ta tronche »)

    On the other hand, « il s'est foutu de moi » means "he took the piss out of me" or "he fooled me" (but far less polite - I don't have a slang equivalent in English, sorry) .

    I really don't know how not to use « se foutre de » in a vulgar way. ;)
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2010
  7. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English

    Ah, interesting. So, despite the expression using the word "foutre" (which, when you look it up and see some of the definitions using the word "fuck," one assumes this is a pretty serious and strong word), using the word in "Je m'en fous de...." really isn't vulgar? Sorry if I come off dense as I sort this out. :)
     
  8. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    I'm sorry I wasn't clear in my last post « je m'en fous de » is vulgar and slang, although pretty common.
     
  9. macdevster

    macdevster Senior Member

    USA, English
    Thanks, philosophia -- you were clear, I didn't read carefully. Thanks again!
     
  10. philosophia

    philosophia Senior Member

    Arcachon, France
    français (France)
    Actually I should have said : I really don't know how not to use « se foutre de » in a not vulgar way.
    Too many negations...;)
     
  11. Maye1950 New Member

    Libreville, GABON
    kitsangui
    What about " I don't care" or "What do I care?"
     
  12. sidevie Senior Member

    Washington, DC
    French/US English
    je m'en fous/fiche
    qu'est-ce que j'en ai à faire/foutre
     
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