se ha enfadado

Creo que una vez (hará siglos) hice una pregunta similar, pero la verdad es que no la he encontrado con el "search". La cosa no me quedó tampoco muy clara así que vuelvo a formular mi pregunta ¿Cómo se diría en inglés "Se ha enfadado" usando el present perfect? (O sea que no vale "He got angry")

Lo lógico: "He has got angry"
Pero eso suena a una posesión extraña... quizás los ingleses de USA podríais usar "He has gotten angry" y quizás sonaría mejor, pero los ingleses de GB no sé como os las apañais.
 
  • Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Creo que una vez (hará siglos) hice una pregunta similar, pero la verdad es que no la he encontrado con el "search". La cosa no me quedó tampoco muy clara así que vuelvo a formular mi pregunta ¿Cómo se diría en inglés "Se ha enfadado" usando el present perfect? (O sea que no vale "He got angry")

    Lo lógico: "He has got angry"
    Pero eso suena a una posesión extraña... quizás los ingleses de USA podríais usar "He has gotten angry" y quizás sonaría mejor, pero los ingleses de GB no sé como os las apañais.
    ¿Quienes son los ingleses de USA? ¿Ciudadanos de Inglaterra que viven en EEUU? :)

    Ambos están bien en este lado:

    He has got angry about that before.
    o
    He has gotten angry about that before .
     

    Linds

    New Member
    USA, English
    They may both be grammatically correct, but "He has gotten angry" sounds MUCH better (to me, at least) than "He has got angry".

    ~Lindsay
     

    te gato

    Senior Member
    Alberta--TGE (te gato English)
    Linds said:
    They may both be grammatically correct, but "He has gotten angry" sounds MUCH better (to me, at least) than "He has got angry".

    ~Lindsay
    Hola linds;
    Welcome to the forum.:) .I agree with you, "He has gotten angry" is much more used.
    te gato;)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    "He has gotten angry" is how Americans say it.
    The British say "He has got angry". There's no "gotten" in modern British English; it's always "got".
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Henrik Larsson said:
    Creo que una vez (hará siglos) hice una pregunta similar, pero la verdad es que no la he encontrado con el "search". La cosa no me quedó tampoco muy clara así que vuelvo a formular mi pregunta ¿Cómo se diría en inglés "Se ha enfadado" usando el present perfect? (O sea que no vale "He got angry")

    Lo lógico: "He has got angry"
    Pero eso suena a una posesión extraña... quizás los ingleses de USA podríais usar "He has gotten angry" y quizás sonaría mejor, pero los ingleses de GB no sé como os las apañais.

    Y por qué te suena mejor "gotten" , es porque "got" te suena a "to have got" de posesión... Claro!! bueno, pero pensá que el pasado participio de "get" es "got" y la versión americana es "gotten" y esta forma da más la sensación de un verbo conjugado en pasado que "got". Es entendible tu forma de pensar.
    Pero bueno, depende de en qué versión quieras hablar: la británica o la americana.
    Ambas son correctas y te puedo asegurar que estando en cualquier sitio, si decís "he got angry" todos te van a entender y nadie pensará que "él tiene enojado".

    Saludos Henrik,
    Art :)
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Outsider said:
    "He has gotten angry" is how Americans say it.
    The British say "He has got angry". There's no "gotten" in modern British English; it's always "got".
    Creo que eso es un mito: Mira:

    For the verb got, gotten is often listed as the American past participle and got as the British past participle. Our research shows that gotten is actually more common than got in British English. This is also true for the verb forget. Fuente: http://www.englishpage.com/irregularverbs/info.html#9
    Supongo en ambos paises depende del oración.
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Outsider said:
    Other sources like http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/got.html and http://www.onestopenglish.com/english_grammar/british_american.htm#Past tense say otherwise...

    The authors of the website you quoted say their research shows that 'gotten' is more common than 'got' in British English, but they do not say where that research can be found. Do you know where I can find it?
    Sorry. I only know what the site said. I know there are websites that say the contrary. That's always a problem. I think I did see another comment that agreed that gotten was used in the UK and the ''evidence'' was found by Googling on UK gotten. I notice that this gets lots of hits, but don't know exactly what it proves.

    If one just asks about an isolated sentence like "I have got/gotten angry'' one is less likely to get a realistic response. A sentence like I am delighted with WUW and even more so with the support I have gotten from you. is likely to sound more natural to both Americans and British. (I found this on a website with .co.uk ending, but it could have been written by an American.) :)

    But it seems really silly to me to say that gotten is never used by modern Brits. That's very hard to believe. At least apparently they like a song that uses the word:

    Marc Almond and Gene Pitney- Somethings Gotten Hold Of My Heart
    ... Somethings Gotten Hold Of My Heart (Marc Almond). Year / Label / ID: ...
    A phenomenal hit around the world, it made the No.1 spot here in the UK. ...
    www.vinylsingles.co.uk/somethingsgotten.htm
     

    Neru

    Senior Member
    UK - Inglés
    I agree that "gotten" is sometimes used as a past participle here in the UK, although it really depends on the construction of the sentence, as mentioned above.
    However, based on my own empirical experience (i.e. having lived here all my life) I would definitely have to disagree that "gotten" is used more often than "got".
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Neru said:
    I agree that "gotten" is sometimes used as a past participle here in the UK, although it really depends on the construction of the sentence, as mentioned above.
    However, based on my own empirical experience (i.e. having lived here all my life) I would definitely have to disagree that "gotten" is used more often than "got".
    Could that be because got is both past tense AND past participle of to get. And got probably comes up in more idiomatic expressions such as: Who has the ball? he's got it (and in this situation I don't think on either side anyone would say he's gotten it. I think also in the US you will hear got much more frequently than gotten. But to say that in the UK they don't say gotten just doesn't sound correct. After all where did we (in the US) get gotten. We must have gotten it from youse guys. :)
     

    Neru

    Senior Member
    UK - Inglés
    Hi. I was referring specifically to the use of "got" as a past-participle, but I agree with the other things you've said.
    I think there's often a tendency in English to use the past tense instead of the present perfect (as I think also happens with Spanish, outside of Spain) so the distinction between the two can sometimes get a little blurred if the past-participle and the preterite are the same.
    Interestingly, I think I would only use "gotten" with "have", but not with the shortened form: eg. I've gotten, you've gotten... for me, that sounds like AE.
    I'd say that "gotten" sounds better in the title of that song, anyway. :)
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Edwin said:
    But to say that in the UK they don't say gotten just doesn't sound correct. After all where did we (in the US) get gotten.
    From Old(er) English, but the British have moved on -- or at least this is how I understand it.

    Edwin said:
    But still the fact that the song is a hit in the UK must means that gotten doesn't sound so strange there. --Or do they like it because of the strange American sound of the word. :) Unlikely.
    How about rest of the lyrics, the music, the voice of the singers, etc.? ;)

    P.S. I shouldn't have written that "gotten" was never used in British English, though. It's still used in some idioms, according to the sites I linked to above. :eek:
     

    Edwin

    Senior Member
    USA / Native Language: English
    Outsider said:
    From Old(er) English, but the British have moved on -- or at least this is how I understand it.


    How about rest of the lyrics, the music, the voice of the singers, etc.? ;)

    P.S. I shouldn't have written that "gotten" was never used in British English, though. It's still used in some idioms, according to the sites I linked to above. :eek:
    Perhaps you are right and ''have gotten'' is rarer in the UK than in the US. At least I find myself agreeing with many of the other UK-US differences on the second website you mentioned.

    So the safest and simplest thing for someone learning English is just to forget about gotten and use only got--which is acceptable no matter where one is.
     
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