se solicita moza, se busca moza

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mbaldasare

Senior Member
Spanish - Argentina
¡Hola! Quisiera saber cómo se dice en inglés cuando un bar busca una moza.
Por ejemplo, pone un cartel en la vidriera del bar que dice algo así como "Se solicita moza" o "se busca moza".
Y si hay una expresión que se suela usar para esto. ¡Gracias!

Nota de la moderadora: Hay que recordar que en castellano tenemos que usar los signos de apertura de exclamación e interrogación y que la omisión de ellos constituye una falta a la ortografía, gracias.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Kerena

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    "Waitress Wanted" y si la solicitan con experiencia pues sería "Experienced Waitress Wanted".
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    "Waitress wanted" -- but this suggests you will not hire a man, and that is illegal!
    "Server wanted" -- would include both male and female, but suggests bringing things to tables rather than working behind the bar.
    "Bartender wanted" -- male or female; this person would work behind the bar, serve drinks at the bar, and would make cocktails for servers to take to tables.
     
    Yes, but aside from the legalities, they were specifically asking for a "waitress" in the original post. Not a bartender. "Server wanted" would work in theory, but it sounds totally off. The answer to the original question, as Kerena said, would be "Waitress wanted."
     

    Lady_Stardust

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish and Catalan
    So in Argentina a "moza" is the same as a waitress?? In Spain it would definitely mean something else o_O
    Anyway, if it's indeed a waitress you're looking for but you wouldn't mind hiring a waiter, I guess you can also say "Waiting staff wanted".
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    Help-wanted solicitations in Argentina do include all kinds of gender and age specifications that would be completely illegal here.
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    El OP dice "Quisiera saber como se dice en inglés cuando un bar busca una moza".
    Puede ser pura curiosidad.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    The sign is to go up in Argentina.
    And you know that...how, precisely?

    If the sign is to go up in Argentina, as you claim, wouldn't it make more sense for it to be written in the language spoken in Argentina? Or am I being too, um, narrow-minded????

    I gave three options, and explained each. I stand by my original answer. I will add that "Waiting staff wanted" is not "perfect", but is instead odd, and not natural English.
     
    In the UK Government official website:

    https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/advice/planning/jobprofiles/Pages/waitingstaff.aspx

    Job profiles

    Waiting staff


    The work

    Waiting staff serve customers by taking orders, serving food and preparing tables. An important part of the work is to make customers feel welcome and comfortable during their meal.

    And this entry in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_staff

    Waiting staff

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    "Waiter" redirects here. For other uses, see Waiter (disambiguation).
    "Waitress" redirects here. For other uses, see Waitress (disambiguation).
    "Waited" redirects here. For other uses, see Waiting.A waitress in the Samjiyon Pegaebong hotel, North Korea.
    Waiting staff, wait staff, waitstaff[1] or serving staff are those who work at a restaurant or a bar, and sometimes in private homes, attending customers—supplying them with food and drink as requested.



    So it looks like a case of potatos potatoes. Please make sure you know what you are taking about before telling others what is and what isn't natural English, if you don't mind.

    EDITED TO REMOVE IRRELEVANT GUESSWORK. (However, I do believe the rest of my reply is, in fact, relevant to the original question)
     
    Last edited:

    Bevj

    Allegra Moderata (Sp/Eng, Cat)
    English (U.K.)
    We are wandering into the realms of guesswork and off-topic commentaries here.
    It would be helpful if mbaldasare could return and tell us if the notice is intended for Argentina or some other country and give us a bit more detail.
    As things stand, a discussion about the legality of his advertisement is irrelevant. The original question is quite clear: how to say 'Se busca/se solicita moza' in English.
     

    Moritzchen

    Senior Member
    Spanish, USA
    And you know that...how, precisely?

    If the sign is to go up in Argentina, as you claim, wouldn't it make more sense for it to be written in the language spoken in Argentina? Or am I being too, um, narrow-minded????

    I gave three options, and explained each. I stand by my original answer. I will add that "Waiting staff wanted" is not "perfect", but is instead odd, and not natural English.
    Because the OP, from Argentina, is asking how to look for a moza in English. Mozo is waiter in Aregntinean Spanish, if she would have wanted the term in neutral Spanish she would have said "camarera" or "mesera", but she asked about "moza". Got it? "moza".I don't know how narrow-minded you may be nor do I care. Misinformed, yes. English is very much in use at least in Buenos Aires to cater to the increasing wave of tourism.
    And by the way, of course you can stand wherever you want.

    Hola! Quisiera saber como se dice en inglés cuando un bar busca una moza. Por ejemplo pone un cartel en la vidriera del bar que dice algo así como "Se solicita moza" o "se busca moza". Y si hay una expresión que se suela usar para esto.

    Gracias!
     

    k-in-sc

    Senior Member
    U.S. English
    We are wandering into the realms of guesswork and off-topic commentaries here.
    It would be helpful if mbaldasare could return and tell us if the notice is intended for Argentina or some other country and give us a bit more detail.
    As things stand, a discussion about the legality of his advertisement is irrelevant. The original question is quite clear: how to say 'Se busca/se solicita moza' in English.
    It seems to me that the legal aspects are relevant if it's for a country where specifying gender is not allowed. But of course we don't know that.
     

    Lady_Stardust

    Senior Member
    Spain, Spanish and Catalan
    And you know that...how, precisely?

    If the sign is to go up in Argentina, as you claim, wouldn't it make more sense for it to be written in the language spoken in Argentina? Or am I being too, um, narrow-minded????

    I gave three options, and explained each. I stand by my original answer. I will add that "Waiting staff wanted" is not "perfect", but is instead odd, and not natural English.
    As Shushi has pointed out, "waiting staff" is indeed correct. It might not be used in the States, but I don't think that makes it unnatural English :)
     

    mbaldasare

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    In the UK Government official website:

    https://nationalcareersservice.direct.gov.uk/advice/planning/jobprofiles/Pages/waitingstaff.aspx

    Job profiles

    Waiting staff


    The work

    Waiting staff serve customers by taking orders, serving food and preparing tables. An important part of the work is to make customers feel welcome and comfortable during their meal.

    And this entry in Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_staff

    Waiting staff

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    "Waiter" redirects here. For other uses, see Waiter (disambiguation).
    "Waitress" redirects here. For other uses, see Waitress (disambiguation).
    "Waited" redirects here. For other uses, see Waiting.A waitress in the Samjiyon Pegaebong hotel, North Korea.
    Waiting staff, wait staff, waitstaff[1] or serving staff are those who work at a restaurant or a bar, and sometimes in private homes, attending customers—supplying them with food and drink as requested.



    So it looks like a case of potatos potatoes. Please make sure you know what you are taking about before telling others what is and what isn't natural English, if you don't mind.

    EDITED TO REMOVE IRRELEVANT GUESSWORK. (However, I do believe the rest of my reply is, in fact, relevant to the original question)

    Gracias a todos por las respuestas! lo que quería saber es cómo se pone cuando un bar (en EE.UU.) busca moza o empleado.
     

    iribela

    Senior Member
    USA
    Spanish - Uruguay
    Gracias a todos por las respuestas! lo que quería saber es cómo se pone cuando un bar (en EE.UU.) busca moza o empleado.
    Como habrás visto, hay varias formas de expresarlo. En EE.UU. podrías ver:
    Wait staff wanted.
    Servers wanted.
    Help wanted.
    y otras, dependiendo del tipo de empleado que busquen (host, bartender, cook, busboy, etc.)
     

    pilipina

    Senior Member
    English & filipino dialect
    Great thread. I am a server in the United States. As well as a Spanish-English Interpreter. The terms waiter and waitress are outdated but still used in small towns. Legally you can't post newspaper ads with "waitress" unless "waiter" is also included. But Server is always the verbiage used in written job announcements. My city, Wenatchee, in the Northwest United States, is big enough, about 100,000 people and 3 hours from Seatte, WA, and we say, "I'm a waitress" in informal speech, but now say, "I'm a server" just as much. Server indicates waitress or waiter, but often include some bartending skills. I am also a bartender. That one is easy. You just say "Bartender wanted" which means you could be serving, but need to know alcohol as well. In the United States we never say "waiting staff". Other countries do use this phrase. "Wait staff" is common in the US. The regional interpretations are what you are disputing. Wait staff is a good translation universally and the most professional sounding. The United States is becoming increasingly casual and wait staff indicates fine dining, or just a very formal translation. I am aware the context is Argentina, but this is information for those researching English so they don't get confused. Regionalism and country is the main argument here. Everyone is actually correct
     

    mbaldasare

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Argentina
    Gracias por las respuestas! Lo que quería saber es cómo se dice (en EE.UU.) cuando un bar busca contratar a una moza. Es decir, si tuvieran que poner un anuncio en el frente del negocio, qué diría ese anuncio.
     

    Mahantongo

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Ah, so the sign isn't for Argentina, but is for the US -- which means that British English usage is irrelevant.

    In that case, I repeat what I said all the way back in post #3: While you may prefer a woman, you cannot legally post a sign that says "Waitress wanted". Therefore , your choices are --
    Server wanted -- would include both male and female, but suggests bringing things to tables rather than working behind the bar.
    Bartender wanted -- male or female; this person would work behind the bar, serve drinks at the bar, and would make cocktails for servers to take to tables.

    "Wait Staff Wanted" is also possible, but it suggests "servers" more than "bartenders", and also suggests there are several positions (and not just one position) available.
     
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