Seamless: meaning "perfect"

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Hello everyone,

The Merriam-Webster Dictionary defines "seamless" in the following way: 3. Seamless: perfect and having no flaws or errors: a seamless [=flawless] performance. My question: Does "seamless" meaning "perfect" sound natural/correct in the examples I made below?

a. I really enjoyed the show. It was seamless. The best ever!
b. He wrote a seamless story. His book was a New York Times best-seller.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    That definition is certainly not the common one, but rather a highly unusual one. Most people do not understand "seamless" to have that meaning. As a result, while your sentence accords with the definition you have found, most native speakers would find that use unfamiliar and unnatural, and some would consider it wrong.
     

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This usage of "seamless" to mean "perfect" is applied where the metaphor makes logical sense. It means something is so perfectly assembled that you can't see the separation of the parts.

    "The seamless blending of historical and invented characters made his book a best-seller."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    A Google search for the phrase "seamless performance" yielded little. Here in the first quote below it's being used not in accordance with the strange Merriam-Webster definition, but with the normal meaning of "continuous", "unbroken".

    Even if life is filled with scenes, life itself is not a scene. Life, if you will, is seamless, continuing performance.

    Lev Vygotsky:Revoltn Scientist

    Here it's being used in a logistics context, and it's defined as "consistency" in performance of a company, in all the countries where it does business:

    * Seamless performance is required of the global company. Seamless simply means that the high level of performance provided in the home country will be consistently offered in every location where a company does business.
    Enhancing logistics to improve the competitiveness of manufacturing organizations.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    That definition is certainly not the common one, but rather a highly unusual one. Most people do not understand "seamless" to have that meaning. As a result, while your sentence accords with the definition you have found, most native speakers would find that use unfamiliar and unnatural, and some would consider it wrong.
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:
    I suggest you forget "seamless" as meaning perfect, even if it might fit in a minuscule number of context.

    (I'd also avoid Merriam-Webster, which has many oddball definitions)
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    I agree with those who suggest generally avoiding "seamless" to mean perfect.

    For a show or a book, people want something more than consistency or parts that fit together neatly. They want the show or the book to be interesting, and to be entertaining or moving or enlightening.
     
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