Second-person gender distinctions in non-Semitic languages?

elroy

Moderator: EHL, Arabic, Hebrew, German(-Spanish)
US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
In Arabic and Hebrew, second-person pronouns and verbs are (to varying degrees) distinguished by gender. I assume at least some other Semitic languages have this feature as well. Are there any non-Semitic languages with second-person gender distinctions?
 
  • Mori.cze

    Senior Member
    Czech
    Czech (and related langueges, Polish, Russian etc) does have a gender distinction on verbs in past tense and conditional, for all persons. Only the third person have separate pronouns, though.

    you worked: pracoval jsi (m) vs pracovala jsi (f) vs pracovalo jsi (n)

    In plural the distinction is maintained in written form only (I believe it to be more alive in Polish)
     

    Riverplatense

    Senior Member
    German — Austria
    Czech (and related langueges, Polish, Russian etc) does have a gender distinction on verbs in past tense and conditional, for all persons. Only the third person have separate pronouns, though.
    That's true; however, etymologically, these forms are old participles, so the distinction is close to sei andato/-a, siete andati/-e in Italian.
     
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