Security alarm system

Rushes

Senior Member
French - France
Hello,

Can you say "I bought a security alarm system to prevent robbery"? to me, "bought" sounds strange and I'm not sure about the English expression used to refer to this situation.

How would you phrase it?

Thank you in advance!
 
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    If you bought it, you bought it. If you had it installed, you paid someone to install it. Perhaps you can elucidate. :)
     

    Rushes

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I mean I bought it and implicitly had it installed. But I don't know if you, native speakers of English, usually emphasise the fact that you "buy" it, implicitly meaning that you had it installed or if it is the other way round: you had it installed, implying you bought it. Hence, there would be no necessity to mention that you payed for it since it goes without saying that you had to pay to have it installed... I'm not sure if I am clear enough... :confused:
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Depending on what I called it, I would probably say:
    I installed a burglar alarm.
    I installed a security system.
    I installed an alarm system.


    As you say, unless I stole it :))), I would have paid for it. So I think the emphasis would be on whether you installed it yourself (as the examples above suggest) or had it installed, e.g. I had a burglar alarm installed.
     

    Rushes

    Senior Member
    French - France
    Thank you very much! :) So, in current English use, you wouldn't mention the fact that you paid for it. I think it's burglar alarm. thank you very much for your help again!
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    There's no need to mention buying it unless it's part of the story: "I was robbed on Thursday, bought a burglar alarm on Friday and installed it on Saturday."

    (There is a difference between burglary and robbery, but we sometimes don't make the distinction in casual speech.)
     

    Rushes

    Senior Member
    French - France
    (There is a difference between burglary and robbery, but we sometimes don't make the distinction in casual speech.)
    Thank you: that was another question, because you wrote "burglar alarm". Could it also be a "robber alarm" (for your personal home, not a bank nor other institutions)
     

    Rushes

    Senior Member
    French - France
    I see there is a cultural difference in here. ;)
    In the UK, you would mention that you "paid for it" whereas in the US, they wouldn't.
     
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