seduce people with a right idea

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
how would you describe someone's act in a situation in which someone's trying to ill-use his/her own knowledge to mis-direct people?

what's the word you would use instead of "seduce"? in this context?
 
  • Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I think we need more context. Is this a confidence trickster who is trying to swindle people out of their money? Is it a corrupt politician who wants to mislead the populace? Is it a stage magician who performs a trick to fool the audience?

    What sort of knowledge does the person have? Who are they trying to deceive?
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    There is a meeting at this company where they are trying to make an important decision. There's only one IT manager who does have some knowledge in the matter. This person keeps trying to force his idea into other members of the management when his idea is critically wrong. But other managers can't really tell if what his words are wrong as they are not in the trade.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think the verb you need is "bamboozle"
    A good word, but perhaps a bit slangy. "Con" is also good. And also a slangy word.

    Perhaps a different approach:

    Like all good confidence men, he sized up his audience, identified his detractors and laser focused his pitch to those who really did not understand what he was selling.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    The thread title has "right idea", but in post #3 I see "his idea is critically wrong". So I haven't understood whether the IT manager's information is good or not. Perhaps his information is correct but his advice is bad? Nagomi also tells us that the IT manager is deliberately trying to misinform the others, but why is he doing that?

    In fact, I'm still confused.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The thread title has "right idea", but in post #3 I see "his idea is critically wrong". So I haven't understood whether the IT manager's information is good or not. Perhaps his information is correct but his advice is bad? Nagomi also tells us that the IT manager is deliberately trying to misinform the others, but why is he doing that?

    In fact, I'm still confused.
    I understood "This person" who is trying to force his idea is not the IT manager, but the person making the pitch. But re-reading it, I see it could be read both ways. We probably need to have Nagomi clarify this.
     
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