see a steam powered ship covered with dirt lying/lie in ruins

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Mensu

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,

1. There on the shore you can see a steam powered ship covered with dirt lying in ruins , waiting to be taken apart.
2. There on the shore you can see a steam powered ship covered with dirt lie in ruins , waiting to be taken apart.

Which would be correct?
If both are correct, I wonder what the difference between them is.

Here's how I understand it:
There on the shore, you can see a steam powered ship (lying?lie?) in ruins. The ship is covered with dirt and waiting to be taken apart.

Is my understanding to the sentences correct?

Thank you in advance

I assume both are correct buthave different meanings.
 
  • Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    >> Is my understanding to the sentences correct?

    Yes.

    Your first sentence is closer to being correct.

    There on the shore you can see a steam powered ship, covered with dirt, lying in ruins, waiting to be taken apart. (Commas added)

    Did you write the sentence(s)?
     

    boozer

    Senior Member
    Bulgarian
    see a ship lie in ruins - this one tells me you are going to witness the act of 'lying in ruins', as though the ship will suddenly and mysteriously disintegrate, of its own accord, before your very eyes. :D (unless, of course, the ship decides to tell untruths while in ruins :) )

    see a ship lying in ruins - you are going to witness the ship in the state of 'lying in ruins'. As Beryl says - you want this one.
     

    Qualityservant

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I agree with the corrections made by Beryl. Remember that you are emphasizing what you are seeing at the moment, hence, lying. Your second sentence would be correct if you added "which lies in ruins" in place of "lie in ruins."
     

    ted maul

    New Member
    English - England
    As an addition and/or tangent, if a ship is 'laid up' or 'lying up' she is taken out of operation (generally due to lack of charter/work) - she can still be afloat, moored, it doesn't refer to her physical position rather her operational state. It's technical or industry terminology, but just thought it would be interesting seeing as you are discussing the verb in this context.

    Also 'broken up', is the most widely used term (at least in shipping) for a ship being scrapped, rather than 'taken apart'.

    Apologies for going slightly off topic, but as British English is littered with nautical phrases I thought it may be interesting/appropriate.
     
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