See & Attend to patients - Collocations

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Hello everyone,

I already know that the verbs "see" and "attend to" can be used meaning "examine, treat, take care of patients". However I don't know what collocations to use with them. Could you please tell me if the sentences below, with "to see", are correct?

a. He is a very good doctor and he sees his patients very well.(= He sees( attends to) his patients with care, patience, dedication.)

b. He saw her very well and she recovered fast. (= He attended to her with so much care, patience and dedication.)

Thank you very much in advance!
 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    a. He is a very good doctor and he sees his patients very well.(= He sees( attends to) his patients with care, patience, dedication.)

    b. He saw her very well and she recovered fast. (= He attended to her with so much care, patience and dedication.)
    Hello Xavier. Sorry, you're miles off with these two: see just doesn't work like that, I'm afraid. You could use attend to (or tend to) in both those sentences.

    I'd say that see, in medical contexts, is more often used from the point of view of the patient rather than the doctor, and has more to do with the act of visiting a doctor than the way the doctor behaves/performs:
    I'm going to have to see a doctor.
    Have you seen a doctor about that lump?
    My doctor refuses to see me since I bled all over his carpet that time.

     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "See to" seems very possible to me, from the patient's point of view as well. It is more informal and colloquial than attend to.
    "My doctor sees to me very well" - he takes care of me/looks after me.

    Hermione
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    "See to" seems very possible to me, from the patient's point of view as well. It is more informal and colloquial than attend to.
    "My doctor sees to me very well" - he takes care of me/looks after me.

    Hermione
    Really, Hermie? ~ I'm surprised. That sounds just-this-side-of-weird to me. (Quite apart from the potential smutty jokes some people might make out of it.)
     
    Hello everyone,

    After searching for options, I found: See a patient properly

    "Part of the problem is that consultants complain about the problems they have: patients not being able to be discharged from hospital, clinics so busy they cannot give time to see patients properly and inappropriate referrals from GPs." (BBC)

    Could I say: He's a very good doctor and he sees his patients properly. ?

    I've also noticed that "attend to" is the most common option when you mention "well" or "properly" as collocations.

    Thank you very much!
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    "Part of the problem is that consultants complain about the problems they have: patients not being able to be discharged from hospital, clinics so busy they cannot give time to see patients properly and inappropriate referrals from GPs." (BBC)
    I'd say that's a slightly different thing, Xavier. See there means 'have time to visit' (I reckon) rather than 'attend to'.

    However, I'm prepared to admit that I might be utterly wrong about all this:eek:
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In ordinary British English, how would you express the idea that a doctor takes good care of her patients? Would you use either of these words, or another?

    I am asking because these are not the words we would use in AE, so finding a natural-sounding collocation would be difficult.
     
    Last edited:
    Hello everyone,

    Again, after carefully searching and analyzing, I concluded:

    1. I was very well attended to and recovered fast.==>Positive sense.

    2. I wasn't properly attended to and got worse.==>Negative sense.

    *These two examples are extremely important to me as they are the equivalents to fundamental expressions in Portuguese.

    Thank you very much!
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Could I say: He's a very good doctor and he sees his patients properly. ?

    I've also noticed that "attend to" is the most common option when you mention "well" or "properly" as collocations.!
    You appear to be quoting an article by Dr David Levy (Doctors must fight for the NHS) from the BBC news site. Levy is said to be a Consultant oncologist and government adviser on cancer.

    The article is political....... Be aware that is not really about doctoring procedure and practice.

    GF..
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello Xavier
    In this quote about consultants' problems, "see patients properly" means have enough time as they need in the consultation to examine and talk with the patient. To my mind its meaning is limited. It doesn't necessarily mean overall quality of care and concern which is what you seem to be looking for, although 'seeing patients properly' is of course a component of that.

    I spend a lot of time talking to people about their health issues but I've never heard anybody say "My doctor sees me properly" - one would have to grasp at the meaning. or ask, what do you mean exactly while smothering an inappropriate smirk at the idea of a doctor "seeing somebody 'improperly'".


    There's nothing the matter with 'to look after' or 'to take good care of'.

    Hermione
     
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