see me through this veil of tears [vale?]

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Oleg68

Senior Member
Russian
I can't understand, does "see me through" mean "help me", "support me" or just "see me", "look at me"?

I come before you with my heart in my hand
Hoping you can see me through this veil of tears
Somehow I've got to make you understand
Ah, don't you know me after all these years?
(Eagles, Center of the Universe)
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    The key phrase is "through this veil of tears". In other words the "you" in the song is crying and has tears in their eyes, and the "I" in the song hopes that they can still see through the tears.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    to see someone through something = to support someone (physically and/or emotionally) until something has ended.

    Through is roughly the same as "during".
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo, PaulQ.

    I suspect your interpretation of the expression would be correct if the sentence were "hoping you can see me through this VALE of tears". Don't you agree?

    GS :)
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I agree with George. I did not notice the veil/vale. Google Ngram makes the "veil" version rare enough to justify the advice
    http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/veil.html The expression “vale of tears” goes back to pious sentiments that consider life on earth to be a series of sorrows to be left behind when we go on to a better world in Heaven. It conjures up an image of a suffering traveler laboring through a valley (“vale” ) of troubles and sorrow. “Veil of tears” is poetic sounding, but it’s a mistake.
    and the context indicates that vale would be correct.

    Although I suppose that, given another context, "... as seen through a veil of tears" might pass muster. :confused:
     

    Giorgio Spizzi

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hullo everyone.

    The cliché was also felicitously employed by the late Paul Samuelson in his all-time bestseller "Economics": "... there's no such thing as a free meal in this vale of tears".

    Best :)
     
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