"see off mavericks"

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SophieD

Senior Member
FRANCE - FRENCH
Un député britannique a quitté son parti pour rejoindre un parti d'extrême droite. Il prononce un discours lors d'un rassemblement.
Quelqu'un (qui n'est pas du même bord politique) dit à propos de ce député : He was hitting every button in that rally. And the people in there didn't have two heads. (...) If there is one thing he understands, it's the mood of disillusion.
Autre personne : You're right. Normally, the system's robust enough TO SEE OFF THE MAVERICKS. Things are different now.

How would you translate "see off the mavericks" in French ? I think the French word "dissidents" would fit (as a translation of mavericks), but what about "see off" ? (Or what other phrase would you use in English ? It could help me to find a translation)
Thanks.
 
  • zam

    Senior Member
    England -french (mother tongue) & english
    = (se charge) d'écarter/d'éliminer les dissidents/francs-tireurs/etc

    Synonyme de maverick (dans le contexte politique) = loose canon

    de 'see off' ici = to chase away
     

    Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    The more common usage (US, anyway) is something like "I'll come to the train station to see you off," a kind gesture to ensure that you leave safely and to say goodbye. Here it just means to make sure you leave: to chase away. Chasser is the obvious choice, but it would work better with de (quelquechose), I think. Renvoyer, perhaps? But maybe that would imply a return to the original party, which is not right. hmph.

    Maverick could be dissident, yes, or maybe radical.

    Edit - saw zam's post - loose cannon is excellent. I just looked up franc-tireur; I would have guessed that it's a straight-shooter, which instead means a direct and candid person in English.
     

    edwingill

    Senior Member
    England English
    a loose cannon is an unpredictable person who is liable to cause unintentional damage. I prefer for maverick non-conformist i.e. someone who does not toe the party line.
     

    zam

    Senior Member
    England -french (mother tongue) & english
    Granted Edwin, but 'loose cannon' is very often used, in politics, in the UK (as I am sure you're well aware of) to define someone who precisely, as you rightly pointed out, will not toe the party line, a dissenter who loves to speak out of turn and is generally uncontrollable (Ken Livingstone springs to mind).

    who is liable to cause unintentional damage
    Yes but not necessarily. I like your 'non-conformist too !
    Anyway, Sophie was after a 'synonym' of 'maverick' and I cannot see why you think 'loose cannon' can't qualify as such.

    Definition of 'loose cannon' (Penguin)= somebody who acts independently and disruptively rather than following the norms of an organisation or group.
    Definition of 'maverick' (Penguin)= An independent and non-conformist individual.
     

    zam

    Senior Member
    England -french (mother tongue) & english
    Kelly B said:
    Edit - saw zam's post - loose cannon is excellent. I just looked up franc-tireur; I would have guessed that it's a straight-shooter, which instead means a direct and candid person in English.
    Thanks kelly.
    Definition of un 'franc-tireur' (Petit Robert)=
    'Fig: Celui qui mène une action indépendante, isolée, n'observe pas la discipline d'un groupe' e.g= 'agir en franc-tireur (to do something off one's bat)

    'Loose cannon'/'maverick' = usually translated as 'franc-tireur' (in a political context).
     

    SophieD

    Senior Member
    FRANCE - FRENCH
    Thanks for your answers.
    I think that here, "see off" means : "to deal with the threat posed by". But maybe I'm wrong. (This is British English)
    Des idées de traduction ?
     
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