see something explode, low and deep, this is because...the way

belongedto

Senior Member
Chinese
Source: VOA Learning English, Pow! Whizz! What Are Onomatopoeia?

Sometimes, onomatopoetic words are even used as adjectives. If you see something explode, you will often see the word boom used to describe the sound. This is because the sound of an explosion is low and deep, the way English speakers pronounce the word boom.

Can I say "If you hear something explode"?
What is the difference between low and deep?
Something in the last sentence seems strange to me, but I am not sure where it is.
 
  • ELance

    Member
    English - American
    Yes in lieu of the first two sees I would write hear.
    Consult with your dictionary for the second question.
    As to the third, I would write the sentence so,
    This is because the sound of an explosion is low and deep, being how English speakers pronounce the word boom.
    Their sentence, as far as I know, is not English.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I wonder why that writer says "boom" can be an adjective. They don't give any example.

    If you see something explode, (in a comic book?) you may see the word boom used to describe the sound. That doesn't make it an adjective, so I don't see what he's getting at.


    Low and deep are similar, but it isn't too unusual to find a pair of synonymous adjectives being used for emphasis.


    This is because the sound of an explosion is low and deep, the way English speakers pronounce the word boom.

    That sentence seems unremarkable. The sound is low and deep, and English speakers pronounce the word boom low and deep. The adjectives are being used as adverbs, which often happens in casual speech. The corresponding adverbs don't exist, or rather they do exist but the meaning would be different or ambiguous. He spoke lowly and deeply.
     
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