See the sun rise square

jazyk

Senior Member
Brazílie, portugalština
In Portuguese, at least in Brazil, we sometimes say ver o sol nascer quadrado, to see the sun rise square, when we mean somebody will end up in jail. I'm interested in equally humorous expressions in as many languages as possible.
 
  • Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    What is the English equivalent? You do not mean "she is doing the porridge", right? Could you write a specific sentence how you use it in Portugeuse?
     

    jazyk

    Senior Member
    Brazílie, portugalština
    What is the English equivalent?
    In Portuguese, at least in Brazil, we sometimes say ver o sol nascer quadrado, to see the sun rise square, when we mean somebody will end up in jail.

    You do not mean "she is doing the porridge", right?
    I don't know what that means.

    Could you write a specific sentence how you use it in Portugeuse?
    Se ele bater mais uma vez na esposa, vai ver o sol nascer quadrado. He will go behind bars/He will go to jail if he beats his wife again.
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Fine. So the English equvalent is: somebody will go behind bars, but you are looking for its more humorous equivalents, right?
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    @jazyk,

    When @Encolpius says 'she is doing porridge' it means that she already is in jail/prison. In THAT context you can say the folloewing in English as well:

    'She's in stir'
    'She's in chok(e)y'
    (I think that's both dated and more American English)
    'She's in the clink' (Again dated, but occurs in Eng. Eng.)
    'She's doing time'
    'She's doing a stretch'
    'She's a guest of His/Majesty'
    (Eng. Eng, obviously. Prisons here are known as 'HMPs' - 'Her Majesty's Prison X')
    'She's in the bridewell' (Eng. Eng. and dated - firstly meant a prison attached to a police station

    For your expression, I'd suggest:

    'She's going down' (Although, this better alludes to her situation upon sentencing by the judge/magistrate)

    And I need to check my Cymraeg/Welsh idioms, but I think we could say:

    Mae hi ar y ffordd i'r tŷ mawr = She's on her way to the big house

    But I need to confirm that.
     

    Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    The related Russian phrase is "небо в клеточку, друзья в полосочку" (nébo v klétochku, druz'yá v polósochku) - "checkered sky, striped friends".
     
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