See you later, alligator

Dymn

Senior Member
A bit silly thread, mind you, but anyway:

Do you have any of these rhyming catchphrases in your language, like the one in the title?

E.g.

Catalan:
és broma, poma "just kidding, apple"
tranquil, pernil "calm down, ham"
adéu, Andreu "byebye, Andreu"
flipa, tulipa "freak out, tulip"
vas bé, cirerer "you're doing well, cherry tree"

Spanish:
qué risa, María Luisa "what a laugh, María Luisa"
qué nivel, Maribel "awesome, Maribel"
me las piro, vampiro "I'm out, vampire"
agur, yogur "byebye (Basque word), yoghurt"
no te enteras, Contreras "you don't get it, Contreras"
chao, pescao "byebye, fish"
 
  • ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Czech:

    čus bus - byebye autobus
    dobrý den, kozy ven - good day, boobs out
    dobrou s kobrou - good night with cobra
    čauky mňauky - byebye miaow
    dobrou noc a ať tě blechy štípou celou noc - good night and let the fleas sting you all night long
     
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    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    When I was young my mother used to say 'Night, night, sleep tight, mind the fairies don't bite.
     

    djmc

    Senior Member
    English - United Kingdom
    Not really. If I say 3i'm not criticising him, mind. The mind has something of the force of nevertheless. If I say 'Mind the dog doesn't bite', or 'mind the doors' mind means watch out for or beware of.
     

    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Czech:
    dobrou noc a ať tě blechy štípou celou noc - good night and let the fleas sting you all night long
    A similar English one:
    Night night, don’t let the bedbugs bite
    This must be quite widespread as you've made me recall a similar one in Catalan my grandmother would say whenever I told her good night.

    -Bona nit! Good night!
    -Totes les puces al teu llit! May all the fleas be in your bed!
     

    ManOfWords

    Senior Member
    Português [Brasil]
    Not really. If I say 3i'm not criticising him, mind. The mind has something of the force of nevertheless. If I say 'Mind the dog doesn't bite', or 'mind the doors' mind means watch out for or beware of.
    'Mind the dog doesn't bite' this one I would have problem, mind (beware of/know the fact that) the dog DOES NOT bite (at all) or (hey I hope) the dog doesn't bite (you) ? :confused:
     

    Messquito

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Taiwan 中文 Taiwanese Hokkien 臺語
    Chinese:
    對不起,敬個禮。(放個屁,臭死你。)(i rhyme) I'm sorry for that, lemme bend over for that; (And I'll fart for that, and you'll die for that.)
    對不起,敬個禮,做個愛心送給你。(i rhyme) I'm sorry for that, lemme bend over for that; And lemme give you my heart for that.

    剪刀石頭布
    ,你沒穿內褲,內褲夾在聯絡簿,送給老師當禮物,老師看了很生氣,一腳把你踢到美國去,美國小姐真美麗,送你一盒巧克力,邊走邊吃邊放屁,阿里巴巴打屁屁 ( u>[i/y] rhyme) Rock, Paper, Scissor; You are no underwear wearer; ...
    (Used to avoid having to say rock paper scissor repeatedly, which is boring.)

    小氣鬼
    ,喝涼水,喝了涼水變魔鬼。(i rhyme) You a miser, you drink cold water, and you turn into Lucifer when you drink that water.
     

    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    Hetkinen, sanoi Putkinen - Just a minute, said Putkinen [surname]
    Some Czech phrases with surnames:

    Dobrý večer, pane Ečer! = Good evening, Mr. Ečer!

    Vojín Kotas. Mám dotaz. = Private Kotas. I have a question. (the 1st part is a mandatory self-introduction of the lower rank person in the army)
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Russian: А потом - суп с котом! (A potom - sup s kotom): And then - a soup with a cat!
    Hungarian: Bácsi, maga nem mohácsi? - Hey, old man, aren't you from Mohács? (town in south Hungary)
     

    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    Russian: А потом - суп с котом! (A potom - sup s kotom): And then - a soup with a cat!
    There is a forero Sup s kotom and I thought when I saw this nick that it means vulture with cat because in Czech sup means vulture. Now I know that it means soup with cat. :D

    Czech:

    (v)o tom potom - about it then
     

    AndrasBP

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    A funny "false friend".:D
    I've just checked that sup means vulture in Croatian, too, but in Russian the word is absent. The bird's name is гриф (grif) - a Latin loanword.
     

    Saley

    Senior Member
    Russian, Ukrainian
    Russian: Опять двадцать пять! [ɐˈpʲætʲ ˈdva.tsətʲ ˈpʲætʲ] ‘Again twenty-five!’
    The phrase is used when something irritating happens once again.
     

    Hercules Grytpype-Thynne

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I'll just leave this here:

    A similar English one:
    Night night, don’t let the bedbugs bite
    Is that the British version? I've always heard it as "Goodnight, sleep tight, don't let the bedbugs bite".

    Other English examples of rhyming phrases:
    No way, José!
    You snooze, you lose.
    The family that prays together, stays together.
    (and other sayings of this form)
     
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    Kotlas

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Russian:
    хитёр бобёр [xʲɪˈtʲɵr bɐˈbʲɵr] - (you're a/he's a) sly beaver


    There is also an old proverb (now practically forgotten) with the same rhyming words:
    Кто прост — тому коровий хвост, а кто хитёр — тому весь бобёр.
    (He who is simple-minded gets a cow's tail, and he who is sly gets the whole beaver.)
     
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    apmoy70

    Senior Member
    Greek
    Greek:

    «Αθηναίοι και Θηβαίοι και κακοί Μυτιληναίοι» [aθiˈne.i ce θiˈve.i ce kaˈci mitiliˈne.i] --> Athenians & Thebans and bad Mytilenians (it's said when we're double-crossed by people we thought they were our friend, just like the ancient Athenians, Thebans and Mytilenians who promised Alexander to help him in his endeavours but they did nothing).
    «Άλλα 'ντ' άλλα της Παρασκευής το γάλα» [ˈala͜ d͜ ˈala tis paɾasceˈvis to ˈɣala] --> whatever and milk on Friday (when comparing apples with oranges).
    «Αραία, αραία να γίνουμε καμιά πενηνταρέα» [aˈɾe.a aˈɾe.a na ʝinume kamˈɲa penindaˈɾe.a] --> sparsely, sparsely, to look we're around fifty (when in a lecture (usually), or a public gathering in general, much fewer people than expected, arrive).
    «Άρες μάρες» [ˈaɾes ˈmaɾes] --> mumbo jumbo (the phrase is a corruption of the ancient Greek one «ἄρᾱ μάρᾱ» ắrā mắrā used in the same context).
    «Δεν γεννήθηκ' από δέντρα ή από πέτρα» [ðen ʝeˈniθik͜ aˈpo ˈðendra i aˈpo ˈpetra] --> I didn't fall from the tree nor was I born of stone (used as a catchphrase in antiquity to stress one's noble descent: «Οὐδ' ἐγώ ἀπὸ δρυός οὐδ' ἀπὸ πέτρης πέφυκα» oud' ĕgṓ ăpò drūós oud' ăpò pétrēs pépʰukă (Plato's Apologia Socratis 34D)).
    «Εξώλης και προώλης» [eˈk͡solis ce proˈolis] --> utterly destroyed before one's time (said for hopeless people; taken from Demosthenes: «ἐξώλης ἀπολοίμην καὶ προώλης» ĕk͡sṓlēs ăpŏloí̯mēn kaì̯ prŏṓlēs --> to be utterly destroyed and before my time (Demosthenes' Against Conon 395:7)).
    «Ήξεις αφίξεις ου εν πολέμῳ θνήξεις» [ˈik͡sis aˈfik͡sis u eɱ͜ boˈlemo ˈθnik͡sis] (MoGr pronunciation) --> one of the ambiguous Delphic forecasts «ἤξεις ἀφίξεις οὐ ἐν πολέμῳ θνήξεις» ḗk͡sei̯s ăpʰík͡sei̯s ou ĕn pŏlémǭ tʰnḗk͡sei̯s; depending on where the pause is made (or the comma is put), the meaning changes: «ἤξεις ἀφίξεις οὐ, ἐν πολέμῳ θνήξεις» (thou shalt go out to war thou shalt return not, thou shalt be killed in war) - «ἤξεις ἀφίξεις, οὐ ἐν πολέμῳ θνήξεις» (thou shalt go out to war thou shalt return, thou shan't be killed in war).
    «Θα γυρίσει ο τροχός, θα γαμήσει κι ο φτωχός» :warning: [θa ʝiˈɾisi o troˈxos θa ɣaˈmisi ci o ftoˈxos] --> the runner stone will grind again, the poor man will f*ck (said in times of oppression, when tyrants grind their subjects; it's a mediaeval catchphrase from the 1250's, during a prolonged drought. While the aristocrats partied often, and experienced no famine, hoi polloi awaited for the rain to fall and turn the watermill, to grind their wheat).
    «Ὀ,τι πράξεις θα εισπράξεις» [ˈoti ˈprak͡sis θa isˈprak͡sis] --> you'll receive according to your actions.
    «Ου με πείσεις καν με πείσῃς» [u me ˈpisis kan me ˈpisis] (MoGr pronunciation) --> I will not be convinced against my will even if you're right (from Aristophanes' play Plutus verse 600 «οὐ μὲ πείσεις κἄν μὲ πείσῃς» ou mĕ́ peí̯sei̯s kắn mĕ̀ peí̯sę̄s).
    «Πίθι ή άπιθι» [ˈpiθi i ˈapiθi] (MoGr pronunciation) --> Drink or leave (i.e. conform to our rules or leave; an ancient Greek catchphrase «πίθι ἤ ἄπιθι» pítʰĭ ḗ ắpitʰĭ used during symposia where the symposiarch, an elected official who presided over a symposium, imposed constraints).
    «Φύρδην-μίγδην» [ˈfirðin ˈmiɣðin] (MoGr pronunciation) --> topsy-turvy, higgledy-piggledy (ancient adverbial catchphrase«φύρδην-μίγδην» pʰúrdēn-mígdēn).
    «Χαλεπά τα καλά» [xaleˈpa ta kaˈla] (MoGr pronunciation) --> knowledge of high things is hard to gain (Plato's Cratylus verse 384b «χαλεπὰ τὰ καλά» kʰălĕpằ tằ kālắ).
     
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    ilocas2

    Banned
    Czech
    :warning:
    Czech:

    kouřit ptáky přes tepláky
    - to suck dicks through sweatpants

    for example:

    (name) kouří ptáky přes tepláky - (name) sucks dicks through sweatpants
     

    Stoggler

    Senior Member
    UK English
    :warning:
    Czech:

    kouřit ptáky přes tepláky
    - to suck dicks through sweatpants

    for example:

    (name) kouří ptáky přes tepláky - (name) sucks dicks through sweatpants
    Is pták slang for penis? I thought it meant bird.
    I remembered a classic one in AE from my childhood: He who smelt it, dealt it - said to someone who complains about a fart, suggesting this person is trying to pretend it wasn't his or her own.

    I found a site with various rhyming variations of this expression:

    He who smelt it...
    A British one on the same subject:
    "Loud, but proud"

    More commonly said but none rhyming is "Silent but deadly".
     
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    Messquito

    Senior Member
    Chinese - Taiwan 中文 Taiwanese Hokkien 臺語
    怎麼辦? 涼拌炒雞蛋。What do I do? Cock-a-doodle-do. (the last part literally means some dish with egg, I used Cock-a-doodle-do only for the sake of rhyming.)

    為什麼? Why?
    因為所以,蟑螂螞蟻,數學國語,社會地理... Because and so, cockroaches and ants, maths and Chinese, social science and geography...

    Okey-dokey.
     

    Kotlas

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    Vojín Kotas. Mám dotaz. = Private Kotas. I have a question. (the 1st part is a mandatory self-introduction of the lower rank person in the army)
    That reminded me: in Russian we have this catch phrase у матросов нет вопросов [u mat'rosaf nyet vap'rosaf] - the sailors have no questions.
    It's an ironic answer to the query, "Have you got any questions?" when all is clear and there is no need for any explanation.
     
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    igusarov

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Do you have any of these rhyming catchphrases in your language, like the one in the title?
    You mean some silly optional rhyming ending words that can be appended to certain common phrase to make it sound funny? Like, you could've said simply "ciao", but you opt to say "ciao, pescao" just for fun, without affecting the meaning. We have a special name for this kind of rhyming words: "присловье".

    Russian:
    "чао какао" = ciao, cocoa.
    "так, сказал бедняк" = ok, said the poor man.
    "вот, сказал бегемот" = here, said the behemoth hippo.
    "следующий, сказал заведующий" = next please, said the principal.
    "в меру, сказал Неру" =~approx. know your limits, said [Jawaharlal] Nehru.
    "пусто, выросла капуста" = empty, cabbage has grown.
    "так тебе и надо, мало шоколада" = you deserve it, not enough chocolate.
    "снова здорово" = again hello.
    "с дороги, куриные ноги!" = get out of my way, chicken legs!
    "муж, объелся груш" = husband, eaten too much pear.
    "сейчас, через час" = right now, an hour later.
    "рёва-корова" = crying baby - a cow.
     
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    DearPrudence

    Dépêche Mod (AL mod)
    IdF
    French (lower Normandy)
    In French

    For "see you later", a colloquial (and quite silly) expression is:
    "À plus, dans le bus !" (see you later in the bus)

    To say "calm down/it's ok/no problem...", we can use the following first names:
    "Cool, Raoul"
    "Relax, Max"
    "Tranquille, Émile"
    "À l'aise, Blaise"

    "Absolutely, you bet!":
    "Je veux, mon neveu" (I want, my nephew)
    "Un peu, mon neveu" (a little, my nephew)

    "Cheers, to your health"
    "À la tienne, Étienne" (to your health, Stephen)

    And a vulgar one
    "dans le cul, Lulu" (in/up your ass, Lulu)
     

    SuperXW

    Senior Member
    The Chinese ones are usually childish sarcasms or insults. I don't know why.
    Here's one I hear when I was young:
    不听不听___念经
    “Not listening, not listening, (monk, or some insulting animal such as turtle) is chanting."

    Used in this way:
    Boy A: "You are stupid!"
    Boy B (covering ears): "I'm not listening!"
    Boy A: "Not listening, not listening, a monk is chanting!"
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Oh, what a fantastic thread! Congratulations Dymn! :thumbsup:

    Hungarian:

    Szevasz, tavasz! (greeting; hello, spring)

    Mit néző, nem vagy te intéző! (if someone is staring at; what are you looking at, you are no (?) ]

    or a more vulgar variant: Mit bámulsz, egyet fingok elájulsz! [what are you staring, I fart and you faint)

    Ne nevess, mert kifut a bableves! (if somone laughs; do not laugh, becase the bean soup boils over)

    Czech:

    Slang greeting

    Tě péro, sombréro!
    - Co novýho? - Posrali holýho! (What's up?...)
    Čest práci, darebáci! (communist greeting)
     
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    bibax

    Senior Member
    Czech (Prague)
    One more bus in Czech:

    plus minus trolejbus (plus minus trolleybus);

    - Jak dlouhé je vlákno DNA?
    - Šest stop, plus minus trolejbus.

    - How long is the average DNA strand?
    - Six feet, plus minus trolleybus (= six feet, very roughly).
     
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    franknagy

    Senior Member
    I remembered a classic one in AE from my childhood: He who smelt it, dealt it - said to someone who complains about a fart, suggesting this person is trying to pretend it wasn't his or her own.


    He who smelt it...
    My wife's rhyming saying about pharisees in Hungarian:
    "Mennél alázatosabb, annál gyalázatosabb."
    =
    "The more humble [she is] the more dishonorable [she is].

    I found a site with various rhyming variations of this expression:
    Yes, I was quite surprised to see another "bus" here!
    Let's note that in French, rhymes with "bus" (with the s pronounced) aren't so easy to find.
    Kindergarten versicle in Hungarian containing bus:
    "Jött egy busz. // Kiesett egy vén krampusz."
    =
    "A bus came // An old buffer fell out. "
     

    franknagy

    Senior Member
    In French

    For "see you later", a colloquial (and quite silly) expression is:
    "À plus, dans le bus !" (see you later in the bus)

    To say "calm down/it's ok/no problem...", we can use the following first names:
    "Cool, Raoul"
    Hungarian:
    "Nyugalom, csigavér" = "Quietude, snail's blood" or with twisted words:
    "Csigalom, nyugavér".
     

    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I learnt this one today: Zapni si poklopec, uletí ti sportovec. - something like - Close your flies or your sportsman will fly away.

    I am very surprised there are almost no English examples. :(:confused:
     
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