See you later, alligator

Discussion in 'All Languages' started by Dymn, Nov 11, 2017.

  1. Penyafort

    Penyafort Senior Member

    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    A few more in EuroSpanish:

    La cagaste, Burt Lancaster "you screw it up, Burt Lancaster" [stress on the second syllable of the surname]
    Te han pillao, bacalao "They got you, you codfish"
    Alucina, vecina "Freak out (in surprise), neighbour!"
    A otra cosa, mariposa "Let's move right along, butterfly"
    Te jodes como dijo Herodes "Fuck you, just as Herod said"

    (I'd say some of them are not said anymore by millennials and zetas)
     
  2. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    Lorraine in France
    English (US Northeast)
    I've heard Latinos in the U.S. greet each other with the expression:
    ¿Qué pasa, calabaza? What's up, squash?
     
  3. AndrasBP

    AndrasBP Senior Member

    Budapest, Hungary
    Hungarian
    Hungarian:

    Bocsánat, nem látta a kacsámat? /'boʧa:nɒt nɛm 'la:t:ɒ ɒ 'kɒʧa:mɒt/
    Excuse me / I'm sorry, have you seen my duck?
     
  4. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    In my childhood we used to say, in Catalan:

    - Què passa? ("What's going on?")
    - Un burro per la plaça, menjant carbassa. ("A donkey around the square, eating pumpkin")
     
  5. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    Lorraine in France
    English (US Northeast)
    Just came to me that they answer Nada, nada. Limonada.

    After while, Crocodile.
    is the response to See you later, Alligator. I don't remember if someone has already said that.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2019
  6. djmc Senior Member

    France
    English - United Kingdom
    In my adolescent years one replied to "See you later alligator" with "In a while crocodile". This was quite common. I think it came from a pop song.
     
  7. merquiades

    merquiades Senior Member

    Lorraine in France
    English (US Northeast)
    The song is by Bill Haley and the Comets. "See you later, alligator". I really don't think the saying came from the song, but rather the song was based on the saying.
     
  8. Dymn

    Dymn Senior Member

    Reminds me of "de eso nada, monada" ("no way, cutie"), which I've only heard on Simpsons dubbings so it's maybe an ad-hoc way to translate "no way, José".
     

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