seedy-giddy-drowsy

Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
Is there any difference between these 3 words? Examples? Is any of these dated or no longer in use in everyday speech? :confused:
 
  • hormiguita

    Senior Member
    San Diego, Calif. (English)
    seedy - often used to describe a bad area of town... someplace where the buildings are old, there's a lot of trash laying around... "Drugs and prostitutes can be found in the seedy part of town."

    giddy - there are two definitions for this word... one could be silly, "The way John is giggling, he looks like a giddy teenage girl."
    another definition would be dizzy... either physical dizziness "He felt giddy when he looked over the edge of the cliff" or emotional dizziness - "she was giddy with love"

    drowsy - means sleepy. "The medication made me drowsy."
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    hi little ant! isn't seedy used also to mean "feeling unwell" ;by the way, is "unwell" a word or have I just coined it? bye!
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Artrella said:
    isn't seedy used also to mean "feeling unwell" ;by the way, is "unwell" a word or have I just coined it? bye!

    Yes, unwell is a word and is used. Seedy does have that definition in my dictionary: seedy 4. tired or sick; out of sorts; low. but, in the US, it would rarely have that meaning. Notice the definition is No. 4 which gives it a less-used definition.
     

    rfpcarpenter

    Member
    UK, English
    seedy is a fairly common word in British English to describe being "unwell" e.g. with flu or a hangover (after drinking too much)
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    rfpcarpenter said:
    seedy is a fairly common word in British English to describe being "unwell" e.g. with flu or a hangover (after drinking too much)

    YES, RFP so I was taught, although in some contexts it means sordid and disreputable, thanks a lot! Art :)
     
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