Seeing her regularly the last time on the weekend

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Mack&Mack

Senior Member
Korea & Korean
Hello,

I'm wondering if the following is correct. I read somewhere and am curious to know whether it's correct.

They have been taking good care of her seeing her regularly the last time on the weekend.

If it is correct I'd like to know why the writer put it that way rather than


They have been taking good care of her while seeing her regularly and the last time was on the weekend.

Could anyone help me with please? Thank you.
 
  • Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "On" the weekend sounds barbaric to me. "At" the weekend, please...
    In AE, it's the other way round. If anyone uses "at the weekend," I know they're a Brit (or from some other BE area) even if I saw it in writing and have no other clues.

    I'd probably put in two commas, or at least two punctuation marks of some sort. The sentence needs them. Are you sure it didn't have them? If it's something you "read somewhere" and presumably don't remember where, is it possible that you remember the punctuation inaccurately?
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I'm wondering if the following is correct. I read somewhere and am curious to know whether it's correct.

    They have been taking good care of her seeing her regularly the last time on the weekend.

    If it is correct I'd like to know why the writer put it that way rather than:
    They have been taking good care of her while seeing her regularly and the last time was on the weekend.
    I wish you'd given us a source, as the forum asks. In any event, the sentence cries out for punctuation, and why there isn't any, I don't know (are you sure you copied it accurately?). I don't think that adding words, as you suggest, would improve it. I think punctuation clarifies it (and with the punctuation, it's quite correct):
    They have been taking good care of her, seeing her regularly—the last time, on the weekend.

    In my opinion, adding words would make it less idiomatic.
     

    Mack&Mack

    Senior Member
    Korea & Korean
    Thank you all for your thoughts.

    I came across this sentence while reading a document written by a welfare worker and the original is as follows. (I just found the document)

    Peter said he maintains contact with his xxx seeing her regularly the last being on the weekend.

    I can't read the word after his so I replaced it with xxx and I am in Sydney. Ah, there weren't any punctuation marks used. I'm letting you know these not to confuse you.

    Could anyone please shed some light on this? Thank you.
     
    Last edited:

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Thank you all for your thoughts.

    I came across this sentence while reading a document written by a welfare worker and the original is as follows. (I just found the document)

    Peter said he maintains contact with his xxx seeing her regularly the last being on the weekend.

    I can't read the word after his so I replaced it with xxx and I am in Sydney. Ah, there weren't any punctuation marks used. I'm letting you know these not to confuse you.

    Could anyone please shed some light on this? Thank you.
    The xxx was apparently some female and the word was either "friend" or a word for a relative (such as sister, mother, wife, aunt, cousin). The sentence could be fixed in the same way as your version: Peter said he maintains contact with his [xxx], seeing her regularly—the last time, on the weekend.

    Shed some light? You mean explain why the poor sentence structure? Probably the reason is that superior writing skill is not one of the requirements for the job of welfare worker. I think probably they are required only to write well enough to convey the necessary information—and that is clear in the sentence you quote.
     

    Mack&Mack

    Senior Member
    Korea & Korean
    [/COLOR][/B]Shed some light? You mean explain why the poor sentence structure? Probably the reason is that superior writing skill is not one of the requirements for the job of welfare worker. I think probably they are required only to write well enough to convey the necessary information—and that is clear in the sentence you quote.
    Thank you paria indeed. Would you put being before on the weekend?

    If so,is it optional? As a non native speaker, putting being there is almost impossible.
     
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