Seem to have departed or seem to depart

2loveIs2remember

Senior Member
Korean
Dear all,

I was wondering if the below sentences are both correct and convey the same meaning.

The vessel does not seem to have departed on the aforementioned date. Can you double check?
The vessel does not seem to depart on the aforementioned date. Can you double check?

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    The sentences do not mean the same thing. One of them uses a past tense and the other uses a present tense, so this should not come as a surprise.
     

    2loveIs2remember

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Hi, the second one is not right. What is the context for this. Did you right them yourself?
    Yes I did. The date I wrote it was 24th of July and the whole thing I wrote was:

    You said the vessle would depart on the 21st of July in the previous email but the vessel does not seem to depart on the aforementioned date. Can you double check?

    I assume that I can use the first version if I don't state the date.

    You said the vessle would depart on the 21st of July in the previous email but the vessel does not seem to have departed yet. Can you double check?

    Am I correct? Thank you again for your help.
     

    EStjarn

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    ... the second one is not right.
    I find this interesting, and I think you're absolutely right.

    (Take for example the Google Web counts for "does depart on" (43) and "does not depart on" (85), which are extremely low figures considering how common 'does', 'not' and 'on' are.)

    Would you care to elaborate on why "does not seem to depart on" is incorrect? For example, would it be incorrect to say, "The vessel does not seem to depart on Wednesdays"?
    One of them uses a past tense and the other uses a present tense...
    I don't see a past tense there, Glen.
     

    almostgal

    Senior Member
    Hi,
    For me neither is correct because you mixed up tenses in the same sentence,
    so I can say you were supposed to say
    The vessels seem have not departed....( this shows the connection of the action that were suppose to be done, that is you wonder until the time of speaking, the vessels were not still departed, present perfect)

    'Am not native speaker of English and anyone feel free to correct me"
     
    Last edited:

    almostgal

    Senior Member
    I find this interesting, and I think you're absolutely right.

    (Take for example the Google Web counts for "does depart on" (43) and "does not depart on" (85), which are extremely low figures considering how common 'does', 'not' and 'on' are.)

    Would you care to elaborate on why "does not seem to depart on" is incorrect? For example, would it be incorrect to say, "The vessel does not seem to depart on Wednesdays"?

    I don't see a past tense there, Glen.
    Yeah, it's incorrect because you seem you're talking about something that have supposed to happen but did not (and this is a past action), so the correct is,' the vessels seem have not departed yet', this means you're speaking of present with reference of the past.
     
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