sell out [meaning 'everything is sold']

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
Hello.

When 'sell out' means 'everything is sold,' I see there are several constructs possible. Are the following possible with, basically, the same meaning?

[1] We sold out the tickets [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday].
[2] We are sold out [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday].
[3] The tickets [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday] sold out.
[4] The tickets sold out [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday]
[5] The tickets [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday] are sold out.
[6] The tickets are sold out [for Thursday/ for the concert on Thursday/ on Thursday]

[Thanks for adding 'l' to 'sod' in my title, moderators]
 
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  • Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    When you say "on" in this context, it implies that is when the tickets sold out, not when the concert is. If you say "The tickets sold out on Thursday", that is when we (or they) sold out the tickets, not when the concert is. Generally I'd avoid using on unless meaning when you (or they) sold out of the tickets. Most of the time you should be alright using the phrase "for the concert on Thursday", but not always.

    "We sold out the tickets for the concert on Thursday" is ambiguous. It could mean that you sold out on Thursday, or that the concert is on Thursday, or both.

    I'd use phrases like these :
    "We sold out of the tickets for Thursday's concert (on Wednesday)." or
    "The tickets for Friday's concert sold out (on Thursday)."
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    [...]

    I'd use phrases like these :
    "We sold out of the tickets for Thursday's concert (on Wednesday)." or
    "The tickets for Friday's concert sold out (on Thursday)."
    Hello, Smauler.

    Thanks.

    The 'of' in your first example is optional, am I right?
    Also, I wondered if the passive forms were used, as in 2, 5 and 6 in my first post.

    Hiro
     

    Smauler

    Senior Member
    British English
    I was wondering about mentioning that "of"... yes, it's optional, and may not be technically right. However, it is how I would say the phrase.

    "We're sold out for Thursday"
    "The tickets for Thursday are sold out"
    "The tickets are sold out for Thursday"

    They're all fine.
     
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