Selling drugs in class

xpell

Senior Member
Spanish - Spain
Just a little question please: In English, does "selling (or slinging) drugs/weed/whatever in class" mean that the stuff was sold inside the classroom or at least the premises, or would it be commonly (and idiomatically) understood as generally selling drugs to other pupils at one's school or college, no matter the exact place (even outside the premises)?
 
  • Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I would understand "Selling drugs in class" to mean that the sales were taking place in the classroom.

    For the other meaning, I would expect something like: "selling drugs to [their] classmates", or "selling drugs to the other students."
     

    xpell

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I would understand "Selling drugs in class" to mean that the sales were taking place in the classroom.

    For the other meaning, I would expect something like: "selling drugs to [their] classmates", or "selling drugs to the other students."
    Thank you very much, Cagey. I was looking for an expression conveying the idea of a pupil selling drugs at an educational institution, without specifying if it's exactly a school, college/university or anything else, or the exact location of the sales (since typically it will happen inside and outside the premises.) If you or someone else can think of alternatives, I'd love to learn about them. :)
     
    Last edited:

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Please give us a complete sentence, and tell us what sort of institution you have in mind.

    The forum rules don't allow us to give you a list, but people can try to find a phrase that suits a specific context.
     

    xpell

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    Please give us a complete sentence, and tell us what sort of institution you have in mind.

    The forum rules don't allow us to give you a list, but people can try to find a phrase that suits a specific context.
    Thank you again, Cagey. It's the story of a person who ended up in prison. Since a young age, this person sold drugs to other classmates in different educational institutions ---middle and high school until dropping out, then a vocational school, then somewhere else (including a boot camp for troubled teens.) Obviously the sales took place inside and outside the premises, as it often happens. That's why I needed a 'generalist' expression. The original complete sentence is: "OK, I'll admit that slinging dope [in class:cross:] wasn't a good idea, but that's how it was."
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I would say:

    "OK, I'll admit that slinging dope to the other students wasn't a good idea, but that's how it was."

    The people attending each of these would be called 'students'. This is about as general as we can get.
     

    xpell

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Spain
    I would say:

    "OK, I'll admit that slinging dope to the other students wasn't a good idea, but that's how it was."

    The people attending each of these would be called 'students'. This is about as general as we can get.
    By far the simplest and clearest alternative that means what you want is "in school."
    Thank you both! I wondered if "in school" would automatically make the reader think that it only happened in middle/high school or the like. :)
     

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes. If it were at the university level, we would probably say "in college". And hopefully no one is doing this at the elementary or kindergarten level.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Where I am, 'school' would include a vocational school. It would become confusing if you wanted to include a college or university. We might not think of them when you said 'school.'

    I suggested 'the other students' because that includes all the educational institutions.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Campus for high school? Must be American.
    I don't understand what you have in mind, or how it relates to our discussion.

    The original poster wants a term that would include "middle and high school, a vocational school." In my experience, 'campus' would not include middle school, and isn't usually used for high school, though it may be.
     

    Uriel-

    Senior Member
    American English
    Probably. Many high schools are so huge that they have multiple buildings, but it is also used if you have only one. You may have off-campus driving privileges at lunch, for example -- permission to leave the school grounds in your car. Often this is restricted to seniors (17-18 year-olds), even though you may legally be able to drive at 16 (while you are a junior).

    Hospitals also refer to their grounds as campuses.
     
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