semi-detached homes...

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Beautifully

Senior Member
Korea, Korean
Greetings!
Visiting here it my most pleasant time of a day.

Semi-detached homes with gardens in leafy suburban areas.

I wonder what that blue words indicate in the sentence.

I have so many questions that I can't wait for the answer before adding another question. Thank you very very much.
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    This is a common expression in the U.K. where row houses are more common than in the U.S., where individual (detached) homes are more the rule.

    See Wikipedia.

    Generally a semi-detached home is two living areas side-by-side in one building. A detached home is a house with one living area.

    In the U.S., we call a house with two living areas a "duplex."
     

    mimome

    New Member
    Swedish
    Do two different families live in a duplex? For me a duplex flat/apartment just means it has an upstairs and a downstairs! :confused:
    One house, two (often identical) living areas. However, there is no internal connection, you never even have to see your neighbours! :)
    Are you with us topsie? :)
     

    Attachments

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Duplex does also seem to mean two-floor apartment, Topsie (source).

    Thankfully, semi-detached has only one meaning in BrE:)
     

    Waylink

    Senior Member
    English (British)
    Duplex does also seem to mean two-floor apartment, Topsie (source).

    Thankfully, semi-detached has only one meaning in BrE:)
    But former British Prime Minister Mrs Thatcher once famously referred to one/some of her renegade ministers as 'semi-detached'.
     

    SilviaO

    New Member
    Argentina
    Please, sombody can help me?
    I need the noun of: Two houses that share a wall and look similar.

    << Please start a new thread for second question.>>
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I grew up in California and also thought of a "duplex" as being an apartment with two floors, but then I moved to the East coast and found that a "duplex" there was a single structure occupied by two side-by-side dwelling units. IAt least in Pittsburgh, if two houses share a single wall (reather than having their walls side by side), it's called a "party wall." In Baltimore and elsewhere, with a whole row of houses side by side with no space between them, they are called "row houses" (each has its own walls, but there is no space between the wall of one house and the wall of another.)
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Few people in the U.S. would understand the term "semi-detached house."

    See this previous thread: semi-detached homes...
    I think it depends on where you live in the U.S. "Semi-detached house/home" is a fairly common thing to see in a real estate listing in the L.A. area, but then our density has been increasing over the years and this type of construction is becoming more common here.
     

    Cypherpunk

    Senior Member
    US, English
    In the Midwest and South, a duplex refers to a single structure with two residences, usually sharing a single common wall (or floor). Whether they are side-by-side or on multiple floors doesn't matter. I once lived in a very large duplex, and the common wall was the back wall of the closets and one bathroom, so we very rarely heard our neighbors.
    On the other hand, I have also seen a split-level duplex in which multiple interior walls were shared between the two residences. They seemed to wind around each other on several floors.
    I live in a 'nice' neighborhood, and we have a central park area. There are two-story residences surrounding the entire park, and they are referred to as 'row houses', but they are all detached. They look like row houses, and they have the narrow, deep floor plan typical of row houses, but I think of what kalamazoo describes as a row house.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    In Canada, it would definitely be a duplex.
    The difference in the U.S., as far as I know, is that a semi-detached house does not actually share a wall but the two exterior walls are inches from each other (and appear to be joined from the outside), while a duplex actually shares an interior wall. A duplex is often built as a rental property, in my experience, while a semi-detached house is a primary residence of the homeowner.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    In Baltimore, these would be "row houses" where all the houses look quite similar from the outside and they look like they are joined, but really they are not joined.

    I have never heard of "semi-detached" in the US and wouldn't understand what it meant, but then I live in Northern California.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    If I saw "semi-detached" in a real estate ad, I would figure that this was somehow different from a completely free-standing individual house with space all around it on all sides, but I would have to go look at it to see exactly what the ad was talking about.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    If I saw "semi-detached" in a real estate ad, I would figure that this was somehow different from a completely free-standing individual house with space all around it on all sides, but I would have to go look at it to see exactly what the ad was talking about.
    Semi-detached is a variation on row homes. In row homes, a number of homes are built in a single row, with each home in the row being connected by a common wall to the homes on either side. In semi-detached homes, the homes are built in a row, but only two homes share a common wall, with a space between those two homes and the next two co-joined homes, and so on down the row.

    In my area, a duplex also refers to two-unit rental property.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I lived in a row house in Baltimore for a long time, and the houses in the row did not actually have shared walls. Each house had its own individual side walls, which were flush or almost flush with the side walls of the houses next door. From the outside, you couldn't see that they were separate, but they didn't actually share a wall. Each house had its own walls.
     

    Titi Hilda

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Hello:

    Where I live there are hundreds of these and they are called duplex.

    In my area, townhouses that share a wall, even though they are duplexes are simply called townhouses.
     

    kalamazoo

    Senior Member
    US, English
    I think Titi HIlda is on the right track. To me a "townhouse" is a house that isn't free-standing but shares a wall with another house, and you can either have a whole row of townhouses or just two townhouses side by side. This is what I would probably most expect to see in a real estate ad.
     

    FromPA

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I think Titi HIlda is on the right track. To me a "townhouse" is a house that isn't free-standing but shares a wall with another house, and you can either have a whole row of townhouses or just two townhouses side by side. This is what I would probably most expect to see in a real estate ad.
    The meaning of the terms vary by region. A townhouse is just a more upscale name for a row house. A duplex and a semi-detached can mean the same thing in certain regions, whereas in other regions a duplex is a 2-unit apartment. There is no right or wrong, just different regional usages.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    In the New York City area, I would expect to hear that described as a "semi-attached house", or (less specifically) an "attached house".

    I find the local preference for "semi-attached" instead of "semi-detached" interesting.

    I will also note that I would never call this a "duplex", which to me indicates a single apartment that extends over more than one floor.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Another two options could be:
    Terrace house
    Duplex
    In Baltimore, these would be "row houses" where all the houses look quite similar from the outside and they look like they are joined, but really they are not joined.
    So a 'terraced house' (BrE) is not the same as 'row houses' (AmE)? Terraced houses are joined. They are different from semi-detached houses which only has one common wall with the house next door.

    A townhouse or a maisonette could be like a terraced house.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    The meaning of the terms vary by region. A townhouse is just a more upscale name for a row house.
    A townhouse, though, at least around here, might be grouped with only one other townhouse. Usually there are more but it is not required. A row house, to me, implies that there are many houses in a row, all next to each other, like brownstones in New York. Can you have only two row houses, side by side, surrounded by single detached homes?
     

    Titi Hilda

    Senior Member
    spanish
    Where I live there are townhouses in a row fashion and there are also two townhouses on one single lot. The later share only one wall so they are really a true duplex but again we just call them townhouses.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Just to confirm the point - these are not semi-detached houses. A semi-detached house will necessarily have a neighbouring house attached on one side, and not on the other as per this example.

    Yes, that is correct. The row homes are many homes that are attached together. I guess you could call the last unit at each end a "semi-detached" unit, but they are, in fact, row homes.

    A semi-detached home would have two separate entrances and share a single wall. Many areas of the USA are not zoned for this type of construction and you will not find these "semi-detached" homes in those areas.

    Here is an example: http://www.laois.ie/text/media/Media,4722,en.JPG
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Yes, that is correct. The row homes are many homes that are attached together. I guess you could call the last unit at each end a "semi-detached" unit, but they are, in fact, row homes.

    A semi-detached home would have two separate entrances and share a single wall. Many areas of the USA are not zoned for this type of construction and you will not find these "semi-detached" homes in those areas.
    Yes, as mentioned earlier, the closest equivalent to 'row homes' is 'terraced houses'. I wouldn't call the house at either end of the terrace 'semi-detached' houses - they would be 'corner terrace houses' (or 'corner terraces').

    I don't understand the reference to 'two separate entrances'. Do you mean a front door and a back door? Wouldn't terraced houses also have them?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Yes, as mentioned earlier, the closest equivalent to 'row homes' is 'terraced houses'. I wouldn't call the house at either end of the terrace 'semi-detached' houses - they would be 'corner terrace houses' (or 'corner terraces').

    I don't understand the reference to 'two separate entrances'. Do you mean a front door and a back door? Wouldn't terraced houses also have them?
    In my experience there are two exterior front doors for "attached homes". One exterior front door for each residence.

    If there is a single common exterior entrance door with a hall way that allows entrance to either residence that would seem very odd to me. I've never seen that.

    Near where I live there are no attached homes as the zoning ordinance requires 50 feet of set back on each side of a residence.

    But near where I work I see a good number of attached homes and they all have two separate exterior front doors, one for each residence. I don't wander around their back yards but I would assume that there are two additional back doors, again one for each residence.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    In my experience there are two exterior front doors for "attached homes". One exterior front door for each residence.
    Thanks. Sorry, I misunderstood. I thought you meant two doors for each house. Yes, of course, separate entrances.
     
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