Send her victorious, Happy and glorious, Long to reign over us

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krutopridumal

New Member
Russian
Hello, I'm having a hard time understanding the sentence structure of these lyrics
Send her victorious,
Happy and glorious,
Long to reign over us
'Victorious, happy and glorious' describes 'her' and 'long' describes her 'reign' as I understand. A few questions though...
Is 'her' the direct or indirect object?
Is 'long to reign over us' an infinitive clause?
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The basic sentence seems to be "Send her to reign over us." So "her" is a direct object. "Long" modifies "reign" (reign for a long time).

    The "to" clause ("to reign over us") shows the purpose of "send". That is the normal use of a "to" infinitive clause after a verb.
     

    krutopridumal

    New Member
    Russian
    The basic sentence seems to be "Send her to reign over us." So "her" is a direct object.
    Thank you! But doesn't that contradict the fact that there is already a queen? The previous lines state

    God save our gracious Queen!
    Long live our noble Queen!
    So there is already a queen, what's the point of "sending her" again? Am I missing something? I thought that 'to reign over us' is the direct object and 'her' is the indirect object. In other words, we ask (God) to send (to give the power) to reign over us to her
     

    krutopridumal

    New Member
    Russian
    Oh... Does 'send' mean 'cause to be in a specified state' in this one? So it's not about physically sending her to us, but it's about giving her the power to rule over us, right?
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    So there is already a queen, what's the point of "sending her" again? Am I missing something?
    Yes. :) It's grammatical gobbedlygook I suppose, emotive words strung together any old how to sound good and maybe fit the tune. I'll have to find out if the music came first.

    These are words from the British national anthem. It's like a poem set to music, so some unusual structures are permissible.
    'Send her victorious' means 'Send her victories', in other words, 'let her win wars'.
    It is addressed to God asking God to
    Let her (reign) be happy and let her be glorious. Let her live a long life, as our queen.
    This last part of the prayer seems to have been answered as far as the present queen is concerned!

    In other words, we ask (God) to send (to give the power) to reign over us to her
    British monarchs do not have 'god-given' power to reign. We spent the 17th century getting rid of the divine right of kings to rule, first by chopping off King Charles I's head in 1649, then by deposing his son James II, in 1688.
    There is a movement to get rid of this national anthem which reflects values that can be seen as outdated.
     
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    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    it's not about physically sending her to us, but it's about giving her the power to rule over us, right?
    Somewhat right, yes, up to the comma. :) As I explain above, it's not about giving the monarch power, or more power. The monarch has very little real power these days. It's a constitutional monarchy. There are plenty of republicans in our nation. Nobody wants the crown to have more power!
    Some people disapprove of this anthem so much, they won't even stand for it or sing it. Quite a few people are worried about the heir to the throne, Prince Charles, meddling with issues that are none of his royal, very limited, business.

    God Save the Queen - Wikipedia
     
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