send-off message

waaalden

New Member
Korean
I am reading Paul Farmer's <To Repair the World>. There are so many things I can't understand. I think it's partly because the writer is a doctor. Anyway, I need help.

What a pleasure to be back in this great city. I'm especially grateful that a former teacher of mine is now your dean, since it means all I have to do to have two nice meals in the French Quarter is to deliver your send-off message. (p. 156)



I think the writer is suggesting the dean's resignation, but I'm not sure. Please let me know what 'two nice meals' and 'send-off message' in the sentence mean. For your reference, it's Paul Farmer's commencement speech in 2008 in Tulane Medical School.
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's "your" send-off message, not "his" send-off message. "Your" must refer to his audience generally and in this case to the new students. I would imagine the "send-off message" is a flippant way of saying "farewell speech", meaning the speech that he may be invited to give when they graduate.

    (He implies that the Dean has taken him out for a nice meal on this occasion, and he looks forward to another one.)
     

    waaalden

    New Member
    Korean
    Thank you for your help.

    I got a hint from your advice. I think the writer had two nice meals during his stay in the French Quarter.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top