send off your invoice to vs send your invoice off to

marsbeing

Senior Member
I have sent your invoice off to Accounts.

I have sent off your invoice to Accounts.

I know it's fine to say "I have sent it off to Accounts." but I am not sure about the above two sentences. I would appreciate it if somebody could tell me which one is correct and explain why.

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • marsbeing

    Senior Member
    Thanks for your feedback, Aunt and Parla.

    Well maybe this is a regional difference? In my experience, Englishmen tend to throw in that 'off' in similar contexts but it seems this is not the case among Americans.
     

    Chimon

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Thanks for your feedback, Aunt and Parla.

    Well maybe this is a regional difference? In my experience, Englishmen tend to throw in that 'off' in similar contexts but it seems this is not the case among Americans.
    As an American English teacher, I don't think off is incorrect, nor is it in poor form or style, and although I agree that it's unnecessary, it is not useless. I think both original sentences work equally well, and the addition of off in those sentences adds a connotation that the sending was done with efficiency or expedition. I might also include off if I wanted to subtly imply that my end of the task has been done, and done promptly, and any hang-outs are someone else's fault and the person I am speaking to should bother those people, and not me, with any further concerns. For example, I might say: "I sent off all your paperwork two weeks ago. If you haven't heard anything back, I suggest you call their office and ask what the holdup is."
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top