send vs. deliver

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Dalian

Senior Member
Mandarin
what's the differece between 'send a letter' and 'deliver a letter', please?
when you send a letter, you give the letter to the recipient via a postman or post office, i.e. you have somebody else to give.
when you deliver a letter, you hand the letter to the receiver by yourself.
Is my understanding correct? :)
 
  • mjscott

    Senior Member
    American English
    Yes, you are correct.

    "via a postman or post office, i.e. you have somebody else to give."
    try, instead:
    "via a postman or post office, i.e. you have somebody else give the person (recipient) the letter.

    Greetings!
     

    Helicopta

    Senior Member
    England - English (Learning Spanish)
    I don't know if this of any use to you but the word deliver is also used in the context of childbirth. Examples:

    "After a dificult delivery, she gave birth to a healthy baby boy" or
    "After a traumatic labour, she delivered a healthy boy"

    "Doctor, I need you to help deliver this child"
     

    jaykemin

    Senior Member
    English
    If I may add,

    To send is to cause something to be transmitted by using a medium.
    To deliver is to personally bring something to the recepient.

    Am I right?

    Hope I was able to help....
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    jaykemin said:
    If I may add,

    To send is to cause something to be transmitted by using a medium.
    To deliver is to personally bring something to the recepient.

    Am I right?

    Hope I was able to help....
    You are correct.
    One may also 'deliver a punch' meaning to hit someone. You do it yourself, without the need for an intermediary. One cannot 'send' a punch.

    C
     

    Fishwife

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    cuchuflete said:
    One may also 'deliver a punch' ... without the need for an intermediary. One cannot 'send' a punch.
    Ordinarily, yes, but I think I have occasionally seen "send" used of a punch. A hypothetical example: "He feinted low with his left and sent a looping right that caught his opponent on the ear." The relation between "send" and "deliver" is the same as previously discussed.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Good point, Fishwife. The arm is the delivery company for the punch, sent by the shoulder, for ultimate delivery by the fist.

    In logistics terms, the shoulder is the shipper, the arm the carrier, the fist the driver or delivery agent, and the ear is the consignee.
     

    Natsuna

    Senior Member
    Japanese / 日本語
    Thank you for supporting our music! The album will be sent to you this week. Everyone, keep checking our YouTube channel for more quality music and artist news!
    (Source: YouTube subscribers winners! - Armada Music)​

    The album will be sent to the recipient this week, but it will not necessarily arrive at his/her address this week, won't it?

    Your iTunes gift cards will be delivered to you this week.
    (Source: 4.23.15 - Parkrose Middle School)​

    The gift cards will arrive at the recipient's address this week, won't they?
     

    Fishwife

    Senior Member
    English - Canada
    Yes, I too agree with both your interpretations, but I get a feeling that the second example is a more specific, less ambiguous promise.

    "Sent" here should strictly mean the beginning of the delivery process (as in, "I sent it but he never received it") but I wouldn't be too surprised to see "send" used loosely to include the whole process or any part. If I heard someone say, "You must send in your contest entry before the end of the month," to prevent misunderstanding I would want to check the fine print to see if they refer to the postmark date or the date received. I can also imagine someone saying, "Look at this vacation postcard my sister sent me yesterday!"

    The "deliver" wording sounds more reliable because I would be surprised to see a delivery date used so imprecisely.
     
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