senza peli sulla lingua

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bozgeez

Senior Member
UK, English
Cosa vuol dire quest'espressione? L'ho trovata in questo contesto:

Sarkozy non ha peli sulla lingua.

Forse in questo contesto si potrebbe tradurre così:

Sarkozy has a big mouth.

bozgeez
 
  • la cri

    Member
    Italiano
    "Non avere peli sulla lingua" significa parlare esplicitamente anche correndo il rischio di essere giudicato male.
     

    juliainitaly

    New Member
    USA English
    not to mince words

    Mostly used when you talk about people who will say anything off of the top of their heads without worrying about what someone might think.
     

    farfalla89

    Member
    English
    I think that "peli sulla lingua" is equivalent to the english "hair on the tongue". To have hair on the tongue means to think about what you say before you say it. To not have hair on your tongue means that you let it all slip out and say exactly what comes to your mind at the moment.

    farfalla ;)
     

    candel

    Senior Member
    english Irish.
    Hi everyone,
    Can someone help me with this idiom?
    E' il solito Maradona, senza peli sulla lingua che dice ciò che pensa e pensa ciò che dice..
    It is the same-old Maradona, without mincing his words he says what he thinks and thinks what he says...
    Is this an accurate rendering? Thanks in advance...
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    E di "cut loose" cosa mi dici? questo son sicuro che è più usato. (sempre che rispecchi l'espressione del thread)
    Non conosco l'espressione con quest'accezione (ma potrebbe essere una mia mancanza). ;) Per me "scappare", (he cut loose from his boring life and went to live in Jamaica) oppure " sfogarsi" (he cut loose on the dance floor last night).

    Puoi postare un esempio di una frase dove si usa per intendere "non avere peli sulla lingua"?:)
     

    shardaneng

    Senior Member
    italian
    Dunque, la definizione che mi ritrovo nel mio file è questa:

    to cut loose: Speak or act without restraint

    Ho degli esempi presi da dialoghi di film, ma è difficile specificare il contesto; questo forse può andare:

    I feel like I cut loose when I'm on-stage. (the rocker)
     

    candel

    Senior Member
    english Irish.
    That certainly makes sense to me. It is similar to "let rip" which can have a very different meaning lol which would render the rocker cool to fool! (Speaking of flatulence) :)
    So the rocker let rip at the concert could mean he really went for it and knocked everyone's socks off or it could mean he had had too many spicy beans before going on stage!
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    to cut loose: Speak or act without restraint

    Ho degli esempi presi da dialoghi di film, ma è difficile specificare il contesto; questo forse può andare:

    I feel like I cut loose when I'm on-stage. (the rocker)
    Your example certainly means to act without restraint (like one of my examples below). My problem is with speak without restraint: maybe it's AE, I wouldn't use it to mean that.:) Let's see what the others think.:)

    PS: freedictionary associates it with behaviour, not speech, like I do.;)

    Edit: Let rip I associate with speech, but if I let rip when speaking, I'm not talking, I'm screaming my head off and using foul language!:D

    Candel, do you speak AE or BE?
     

    candel

    Senior Member
    english Irish.
    It is more American, but I tend to speak a mix...don't we all these days in our global English village? I mean do we not easily swap Eastenders with American Idol? I assure you it does have the vulgar connotation! Did you let one go? Did you let one rip is the American version but we do understand these things now through the medium of television. Yes also I waited my time and then I let him have it, I let rip and told him a piece of my mind...but also I waited my time and then I let him have it, I let rip and then he just blanched as I lit a match to my gas and singed his hair off!
    Language can be versatile and vague especially with these type of expressions. Where do you live London? I am in Britain.
    ' London, i would not agree that let rip applies to screaming and swearing, it can do, and imply that, but it can just mean that I gave a piece of my mind...and that can be done without all the antics of swearing and yelling in my opinion.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It is more American, but I tend to speak a mix...don't we all these days in our global English village? I mean do we not easily swap Eastenders with American Idol? You might, I don't;)..I detest Transatlantic English:D. As far as I'm concerned you either speak one brand of English or the other.;) .I assure you it does have the vulgar connotation! I know, I use it like that as well. ;) What I meant was that I don't use "cut loose" to mean "speak without restraint", whereas let rip I use to express both "speak and act without restraint.".:) Where do you live London? I am in Britain. I'm from Greenwich but I live in Italy.:)
     

    candel

    Senior Member
    english Irish.
    Where do you live London? I am in Britain. I'm from Greenwich but I live in Italy. Are you a quantum cockney then? to be in two places at once? :) I think if I read "The reverend began quietly lambasting his flock for all the worthless Euros that they were putting in the collection tray, then as he addressed them about the rumours circulating concerning Pedro the travestie,his cuban home-help, he really began to cut loose." I would take it that he began to talk or lecture without restraint.
    I can't help mix the two Englishes. It seems easier to let them mingle, like people .
     
    Last edited:

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Are you a quantum cockney then? :) then as he addressed them about the rumours circulating concerning Pedro the travestie,his cuban home-help, he really began to cut loose." I would take it that he began to talk or lecture without restraint.
    I can't help mix the two Englishes. Your choice.;)
    Fair enough!:) It still sounds American to me, however ;) (which is not a problem, let me assure you: I just prefer not to speak it myself.;)).


    PS. I'm not a Cockney: I was born in Greenwich, which is not within the sound of Bow Bells.;)
     

    Odysseus54

    Mod huc mod illuc
    Italian - Marche
    Where do you live London? I am in Britain. I'm from Greenwich but I live in Italy. Are you a quantum cockney then? to be in two places at once? :) I think if I read "The reverend began quietly lambasting his flock for all the worthless Euros that they were putting in the collection tray, then as he addressed them about the rumours circulating concerning Pedro the travestie,his cuban home-help, he really began to cut loose." I would take it that he began to talk or lecture without restraint.
    I can't help mix the two Englishes. It seems easier to let them mingle, like people .
    But this does not quite translate "parlare senza peli sulla lingua" ( "being blunt" ) , but rather "cantargliene quattro" ( "let them have it" ), don't you think ?
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    But this does not quite translate "parlare senza peli sulla lingua" ( "being blunt" ) , but rather "cantargliene quattro" ( "let them have it" ), don't you think ?
    Yes, that's how I'd understand it in this context as well. It's like "to let rip".;)

    Candel however seems to think otherwise so, as I said, fair enough!:)
     

    candel

    Senior Member
    english Irish.
    I think myself and London as natives got sidetracked into just how you can use the English expression "let rip" and "cut loose"...I in no way lay claim as to the eminence regarding the Italian expressions. I am sure you both are better qualified than my good humble self. :) We considered Amer-english and such others and I am sure London as the decent London gal that she is will own up to her share of the digression...
     

    Paulfromitaly

    MODerator
    Italian
    1) Since when should anyone have blind faith in a language dictionary? :rolleyes:
    2) Assuming the dictionary got the translation right (this time), the correct English would be "not TO mince one's words"
    It's not a matter of "blind faith", but rather of authority and the authority of the Oxford Dictionary is hardly questionable.
    http://www.wordreference.com/iten/pelo
    Concise Oxford Paravia Italian Dictionary © 2009 Pearson Paravia Bruno Mondadori spa e Oxford University Press

    non avere peli sulla lingua to be outspoken, not to mince one’s words;
    Having said that, there are of course other ways to translate the same idiom as the 27 messages posted in this thread have shown.
     
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