Ser/ Estar propriedad/ experiencia

aedrivera

Member
English
I am having trouble understanding the difference between ser and estar in the following examples. My girlfriend (from Venezuela) thinks they should all be "estuvo" since the speaker is talking about his experience. My grammar book (from Spain) uses the example, "La fiesta fue aburrida," because "aburrida" "causa la sensación." Also, the book says that you should not use "estar bueno/ malo" but "estar bien/ mal," "Estoy bien" means well/ good and "estoy bueno" can mean "handsome." Also, "todo está bien" is a common expression, but "ahora la silla está bien" (like it was broken but now it is not) seems weird. I want to say "ahora la silla está buena."

1.) La fiesta estuvo aburrida/ buena/ mala/ divertida.

2.) La fiesta fue aburrida/ buena/ mala/ divertida.

3.) El tiempo estuvo malo.

4.) El tiempo fue malo.

I think the difference is estar (propiedad de la situación) and ser (causa la sensación). My answers are:

1.) La fiesta fue aburrida. La fiesta estuvo buena. La fiesta estuvo mala. La fiesta fue divertida.
(causes boredom, was good, was bad, causes fun)

2.) El tiempo estuvo malo.
(was bad)

3.) El tiempo fue malo.
(INCORRECT)

Here is another example to further complicate things.

El piso está bueno. (now, it is a nice, clean, good floor, but before it wasn't)
El piso es bueno. (generally good floor, goodness is a property it posses)
El piso está bien. (??? incorrect ???)

Thank you for your help in advance.
 
  • micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    This is a difficult question because the way we say those things in Latin America differ from the way they say them in Spain.

    It seems we use more "estar" than they do. To be honest, I think I've said all those sentences at some point in my life. Whether they are correct or not, they're all said.

    It is complicated and very difficult to explain.

    I wish I could help you more. :eek:
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Gosh! There are a lot of different points here, so let me help you clear up one. "Bien" and "bueno". As you know, "bien" can only go with "estar" and when we use "bien" we should be able to translate "ok" instead of good/well. From your examples; "I'm well (OK)", "Everything is OK" "The chair is OK now (better than the chair is good now). The flat is OK (it's good). The flat is neither handsome/fit nor angelic (good) so you can't use either of the first two.

    Then "aburrido". With estar it refers to a temporary state/emotion in a person = bored, and with ser it refers to a "permanent" quality of things or people = boring. So "la fiesta estuvo aburrida" is not possible, only "fue aburrida".

    So, your sentences. The correct forms are (in Spain);

    1) La fiesta fue aburrida/divertida. La fiesta estuvo bien/mal. (You can't use "estuvo buena/mala" for the same reasons as with the flat).

    2) El tiempo estuvo bien/mal (good, OK). I'd say "estuvo bueno/malo" is not normal, but it may be used by some people.

    3) El tiempo fue bueno/malo.

    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited:

    Quique Alfaro

    Senior Member
    castellano
    Hola:

    Por acá también solemos decir " La fiesta estuvo aburrida". De hecho la pregunta habitual es "¿Qué tal estuvo la fiesta?"
    Pero también podría decirse que la fiesta fue aburrida. Con frases aisladas es difícil decidirse.

    Con el tiempo generalmente recurrimos a hacer: Hizo buen tiempo.

    Con este tipo de cuestiones las variaciones regionales pueden ser amplísimas.
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    We say "la fiesta estuvo aburrida" :(
    Yes, I'm sure there are regional differences, as with everything, but I think the simple "aburrido" rule of ser = boring, estar= bored would help Aedrivera to produce only correct sentences with this structure and avoid the embarrassing "Creo que tú eres aburrido" -type of mistake.
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Yes, I'm sure there are regional differences, as with everything, but I think the simple "aburrido" rule of ser = boring, estar= bored would help Aedrivera to produce only correct sentences with this structure and avoid the embarrassing "Creo que tú eres aburrido" -type of mistake.
    I'm just saying how I speak my language. This particular subject is quite difficult to explain considering all the differences between the countries.

    That's why someone from Latin America says "in my country we say....." and someone from Spain says "in Spain we say.."

    It can be confusing for the students, but that's they way it is, little by little they might start to learn the differences.
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I'm just saying how I speak my language. This particular subject is quite difficult to explain considering all the differences between the countries.

    That's why someone from Latin America says "in my country we say....." and someone from Spain says "in Spain we say.."

    It can be confusing for the students, but that's they way it is, little by little they might start to learn the differences.
    I agree, but I think that someone starting to learn a foreign language needs to be exposed to and learn one form well, depending on where he is going to live/travel/etc before worrying about the vast array of regional differences that we are aware of on this forum. Otherwise it would be so confusing he would probably give up before he even started. I know I would have!
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Jenny, I understand what you're saying but there are people here from all over Latin America and each one of those persons will answer the question according to the language spoken in his country. The students cannot expect all people here to use exactly the same terms. That's why I say it's very difficult.

    To me, "la fiesta fue aburrida" sounds very strange and I've never said it. Actually I've never heard it said in Colombia. T

    That's the problem Jenny. We speak the same language but with a lot of differences. :(
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Jenny, I understand what you're saying but there are people here from all over Latin America and each one of those persons will answer the question according to the language spoken in his country. The students cannot expect all people here to use exactly the same terms. That's why I say it's very difficult.

    To me, "la fiesta fue aburrida" sounds very strange and I've never said it. Actually I've never heard it said in Colombia. T

    That's the problem Jenny. We speak the same language but with a lot of differences. :(
    And do you say "Esta fiesta es aburrida" y "el libro es aburrido"?
     
    Last edited:

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    And do you say "Esta fiesta es aburrida" y "el libro es aburrido"?
    No. In Colombia we say "aburridor". (boring)

    "Este libro está muy aburridor
    " (when I'm reading it). If later on someone asks me about that book, I say "Ese libro es muy aburridor".

    We use "aburrido" (bored) in a different context: "Estoy aburrida en esta fiesta".

    I also say "Juan es una persona muy aburrida", meaning he is always bored.
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    No. In Colombia we say "aburridor". (boring)

    "Este libro está muy aburridor
    " (when I'm reading it). If later on someone asks me about that book, I say "Ese libro es muy aburridor".

    We use "aburrido" (bored) in a different context: "Estoy aburrida en esta fiesta".

    I also say "Juan es una persona muy aburrida", meaning he is always bored.
    So do you say "Juan es una persona muy abuuridor" to say he's boring?
     

    micafe

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombia
    Yes. "Juan es una persona muy aburridora" if he's boring, not good company and he makes me "aburrida"

    aburridor = boring
    aburrido = bored

    They are used exactly the same as in English.

    I think it's clever.
     

    JennyTW

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Yes. "Juan es una persona muy aburridora" if he's boring, not good company and he makes me "aburrida"

    aburridor = boring
    aburrido = bored

    They are used exactly the same as in English.

    I think it's clever.
    Well yes, I think it's more logical than having the same adjective for both, but as I teach here, I have to find easy ways to help students understand how the language works here.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Por acá decimos comúnmente: "la fiesta estuvo aburrida/fea/divertida/entretenida".
    Pero es correcto: "la fiesta fue aburrida/fea/divertida/entretenida"

    El uso de ser/estar bueno o malo
    Estar bien/mal

    Objeto (por ejemplo: piso)

    El piso está bueno (Está en buenas condiciones en este momento)
    El piso estaba bueno (Durante un tiempo en el pasado se mantuvo en buenas condiciones "y ahora empezó a deteriorarse")
    El piso es bueno (Tiene materiales de calidad)
    El piso fue bueno (Durante un tiempo puntual resultó ser un piso que no se deterioró)
    El piso está bien (No necesita reparación/arreglo, etc)
    Este piso está bien para patinar (es resbaladizo, firme y sirve entonces para patinar)
    El piso estaba bien (resistente durante un tiempo) hasta que empezó a resquebrajarse.
    El piso estuvo bueno para hacer ejercicio físico porque tenía alfombra y era suave (En un momento puntual en el pasado)

    El piso es bien/mal INCORRECTO

    Tiempo

    El tiempo está bueno/malo (Hay una temperatura agradable hoy/llueve hoy)
    El tiempo estaba bueno/malo ayer (Ayer en particular en forma continua había buen/mal tiempo. Hacía buen/mal tiempo)
    El tiempo estuvo bueno ayer (Ayer como hecho puntual hubo mal tiempo)
    El tiempo fue bueno cuando estuve en Buenos Aires. Pero más comúnmente (yo diría): "Estuvo bueno" (o Hizo/hubo buen tiempo)
    es más frecuente porque se supone que hubo una cierta duración (estuvo), es decir, hubo buen tiempo por un intervalo más o menos prolongado. Si digo "fue bueno" pareciera que fue un hecho muy puntual y sin continuidad temporal..
    El tiempo es bueno/malo en Buenos Aires (En forma permanente, es una cualidad positiva o negativa que -prácticamente- no cambia)

    El tiempo está bien/mal hoy
    (Cualidad NO permanente. El tiempo está como debe estar, como corresponde que esté)
    El tiempo estuvo bien/mal ayer (Cualidad NO permanente. El tiempo estuvo como debió estar o como se supone que debió estar o como se esperó que estuviese)
    El tiempo estaba bien/mal ayer (Cualidad NO permanente. El tiempo estaba como debía estar o como correspondía que debía estar o como se esperaba que estuviese)

    El tiempo es bien/mal INCORRECTO

    Persona

    Carlos es una buena/mala persona (Tiene buenos o malos sentimientos y hace el bien o el mal a otros. Cualidad permanente)
    Carlos fue bueno conmigo cuando necesité de su ayuda (Se comportó solidariamente en un momento en el pasado)

    Carlos está bueno hoy (Hoy se comporta/actúa bien conmigo, está amable, generoso, compasivo)
    Carlos está bueno (Segundo sentido, más informal. En Argentina también "Carlos esté fuerte"): El es guapo, apuesto, bello, musculoso.

    Carlos estaba buenoayer (Ayer puntualmente se comportó en forma solidaria. "Estaba" denota continuidad en el pasado)
    Carlos estuvo buenoayer (Ayer se comportó en forma solidaria. Hecho puntual)
    Carlos está bien (Se encuentra en buenas condiciones de salud. No está enfermo)
    Carlos estuvo bien la semana pasada (Se encontraba en buenas condiciones de salud puntualmente la semana pasada)
    Carlos estaba bien la semana pasada (Se encontraba en buenas condiciones de salud en forma continua durante la semana pasada)

    Carlos es bien/mal INCORRECTO
     
    Last edited:

    levmac

    Senior Member
    British English
    AND an extra bit of confusion: bear in mind fue can be the past of "IR", so although you cannot say FUE bien in the sense of ser, you can say it to mean IR.

    Present: es bueno past: fue bueno
    Present: va bien Past: fue bien

    La fiesta fue bien = the party went well.
     

    Gamen

    Banned
    Spanish Argentina
    Es verdad. Un hecho curioso de la lengua española.
    El verbo "ser" y el verbo "ir" coinciden exactamente en todas las personas del pretérito simple del subjuntivo:


    Pretérito perfecto simple del indicativo para "ser" e "ir"
    Yo fui
    Tu fuiste
    El fue
    Nosotros Fuimos
    Vosotros Fuistes
    Ellos fueron
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top