serigrafato

  • Juri

    Senior Member
    italian/Slovenia
    La serigrafia e' silk-screen printing, ma anche serigraphy, serigraph copy
    serigrafare: to screen print
    Col testo tecnico si puo' usare serigraphy, se e' divulgativo, l'altro(s-s.p.)
     

    anglomania1

    Senior Member
    UK English
    You may also say: silk screened / silk screen printed

    Hi there, I'd like to add a question here.
    For my birthday my husband bought me a pendant "oro bianco serigrafato".
    In this case, surely it can't be silk-screened gold??
    Thanks for any ideas how to say this in English,
    Anglo
     

    anglomania1

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Speaking as a printmaker, the basic printing process involves a transfer of images to PRINT copies of the same image. Here's the wikipedia explanation of serigrafia: http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serigrafia. Google suggests "screen-printed gold" - which sounds reasonable to me.

    Hi there and thanks for your reply:),

    the gold is actually scratched to make it look glittery - in fact, I got it wrong at first and thought people meant "serigraffiato" as that made more sense to me!!:p
    But I was corrected and told it's serigrafato, so I thought I'd ask here how to say it in English.

    I did see the Wiki page and saw it mentioned little pieces of gold added to the ink when printing, to make the effect glittery.
    But in the case of my pendant, I don't think any printing is involved.
    I'm not sure that an English person would understand if I said I had a screen-printed gold pendant:(.
    I need to have another look on the internet and get back to you.
    Thanks,
    Anglo
     

    The Harper

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    Hi there and thanks for your reply:),

    the gold is actually scratched to make it look glittery - in fact, I got it wrong at first and thought people meant "serigraffiato" as that made more sense to me!!:p
    But I was corrected and told it's serigrafato, so I thought I'd ask here how to say it in English.

    I did see the Wiki page and saw it mentioned little pieces of gold added to the ink when printing, to make the effect glittery.
    But in the case of my pendant, I don't think any printing is involved.
    I'm not sure that an English person would understand if I said I had a screen-printed gold pendant:(.
    I need to have another look on the internet and get back to you.
    Thanks,
    Anglo

    I've also come across this same problem a few times, particularly when talking about glass and silk-screen printing doesn't seem to be the right translation. Comparing pictures of vetro serigrafato and etched glass, I've come to the conclusion that 'etched' is the right word, but I'd love to have some confirmation of that supposition! When I compare the Wikipedia entries for serigrafia and serigraphy it seems to me that the English sense is much more narrow.
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi The Harper,
    I don't think that "etched" is the English for "serigrafato". The technique of etching is carried out with acid, and the glass treated with this technique is called "vetro acidato". A "vetro serigrafato" is printed with colours, no acid.
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AmE - hillbilly ;)
    Hi The Harper,
    I don't think that "etched" is the English for "serigrafato". The technique of etching is carried out with acid, and the glass treated with this technique is called "vetro acidato". A "vetro serigrafato" is printed with colours, no acid.

    Mary, etching doesn't always include placing something in acid (as one usually does, for copper or zinc plates in printmaking). A plate (or a glass or gold surface) can also be etched with an instrument called a "bulino," (both in Italian and English, as it's specialized language) or with a sharply pointed instrument that scratches the surface. In the case of glass or gold, the etched surface itself is the decoration; in the case of a plate, the scratches (though less deep than those placed in acid) will still hold ink. Etching (on metal plates, using acid) is called "acquaforte" in Italian. Etching (always on metal plates, but without acid) is called "puntosecco." Both kinds of etching can also be called "incisione."

    Thus stated, a "vetro serigrafato" (printed with colors, as you say) is probably done with silk-screening (which is the usual translation of serigrafia).
     

    Mary49

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi curio,
    as far as I know etching always uses acids or mordants to work on unprotected parts of a metal surface. http://www.magical-secrets.com/studio/etching_aquatint http://www.siobancoppinger.co.uk/techniques/
    When you use an engraver ("bulino") without acid you realize an "engraving" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_engraving . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engraving
    As regards your sentence
    Etching (always on metal plates, but without acid) is called "puntosecco."
    this is "puntasecca" http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puntasecca
     

    curiosone

    Senior Member
    AmE - hillbilly ;)
    Hi curio,
    as far as I know etching always uses acids or mordants to work on unprotected parts of a metal surface. http://www.magical-secrets.com/studio/etching_aquatint http://www.siobancoppinger.co.uk/techniques/
    When you use an engraver ("bulino") without acid you realize an "engraving" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass_engraving . http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Engraving
    As regards your sentence this is "puntasecca" http://it.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puntasecca

    Regarding "puntasecca", thanks for the correction Mary. I have always had trouble with the illogic (in the Italian language) of giving "sex" (male or female) to inanimate objects lacking reproductive organs! :p

    You're right that glass (etched with a bulino) is engraved, and that a plate etched with a bulino is also called an engraving. BUT I'd like to point out that"incisione" translates to both "etching" and "engraving" in this context, just as the verb "to etch" translates to "incidere/intagliare". Both are general terms that include various (more specific) techniques than can be used to work on a plate/lastra. "Printmaking" also covers techniques like serigrafia/silk-screen printing, litografia/lithography, xilografiat/wood cuts, linoleografia/lino-cuts, etc.

    Returning to our discussion of the term "etching," while I agree that it usually involves putting a plate in an acid (for zinc) or a mordant (for copper), I still insist that one can also do "drypoint etching" ("puntasecca" in Italian) without using an acid or mordant (I've been a printmaker for over 40 years). And most printmakers use a variety of techniques, often mixed together on a single plate.

    So there's a reason why art schools prefer the more generic term "printmaking" ("incisione" in the Italian Accademia delle Belle Arti). Printmaking covers not only all the various techniques used to make prints from a metal surface, but also includes other printmaking techniques such as: serigrafia/silk-screen printing (the main subject of this thread), litografia/lithography, xilografia/wood-cuts, linoleografia/lino-cuts, etc.
     
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