Serrucharle el piso a alguien

Artrella

Banned
BA
Spanish-Argentina
Hola, "serrucharle el piso a alguien en el trabajo" por ejemplo... se dice "pull the rug under someone's feet"?

Dañar el negocio, la movida, quitar el trabajo, o quitar algo. Ej : Tu asistente te quiere serruchar el piso.

:)
 
  • Narda

    Senior Member
    Guatemala
    Serruchar el piso is undermine somebody's efforts or work behind the screen in order to have him fired and then take over his job.

    I thought that pull the rug out from under someone is less specific, covers an array of situations:

    Like the parents that divorce all of a sudden pull the rug out from under the child's feet.

    Am I correct or not.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Narda said:
    Serruchar el piso is undermine somebody's efforts or work behind the screen in order to have him fired and then take over his job.

    I thought that pull the rug out from under someone is less specific, covers an array of situations:

    Like the parents that divorce all of a sudden pull the rug out from under the child's feet.

    Am I correct or not.


    Narda your definition of the expression in Spanish is perfect, you are right in that the English version is not that specific, but I don't think they have one for that particular situation.
     

    Narda

    Senior Member
    Guatemala
    Yeap, I haven't heard one either. In Spanish there is another one for the same situation: "Le hizo la casita". Have you heard that? My former boss, from Spain used it once or twice.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Narda said:
    Yeap, I haven't heard one either. In Spanish there is another one for the same situation: "Le hizo la casita". Have you heard that? My former boss, from Spain used it once or twice.


    No, I've never heard that. Instead we say "le hizo la cama"... ;)
     

    Gringosimo

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "To pull th rug out from under someones feet" is used to express a situation where someone takes a loss because someone else did something to affect their circumstances. So, it is a very general concept.

    I'll try to give an example to see if it helps...

    Toms parents told him they would give him money for the downpayment on a car but after he had ordered the car and filled out all the paperwork at the dealership they pulled the rug out from under his feet by changing their mind causing him to lose the money he had already put down.

    hope it helps. :)
     

    Narda

    Senior Member
    Guatemala
    Gringosimo said:
    I was just thinking....sounds like someone "stuck a knife in his back".

    You know what? It is true, except that: Le metió un cuchillo por la espalda refers to all kinds of treason.

    A good friend that rattles his/her friends secret le mete un cuchillo por la espalda.

    The same friend makes fun of the other, se siente como si le hubieran metido un cuchillo por la espalda.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Narda said:
    You know what? It is true, except that: Le metió un cuchillo por la espalda refers to all kinds of treason.

    A good friend that rattles his/her friends secret le mete un cuchillo por la espalda.

    The same friend makes fun of the other, se siente como si le hubieran metido un cuchillo por la espalda.


    "Clavar el puñal por la espalda" in Argentina, meaning "betrayal"
     

    Gringosimo

    Senior Member
    USA English
    A knife in the back in AE is also betrayal. If a friend of mine stuck a knife in my back (figuratively ;) ) they would no longer be my friend. I suppose it can be used in a joking sense as well but I haven't heard it that way as far as I can recall.
     

    Chaucer

    Senior Member
    US inglés/español
    Artrella said:
    Hola, "serrucharle el piso a alguien en el trabajo" por ejemplo... se dice "pull the rug under someone's feet"?

    Dañar el negocio, la movida, quitar el trabajo, o quitar algo. Ej : Tu asistente te quiere serruchar el piso. :)

    He aquí otras opciones que encajarían dentro de ciertos contextos:

    to horn in on someone o to horn in on something o to horn in on something of/belonging to someone

    Your assistant wants to horn in on you[r job]. Quitarte el trabajo, hacerte a lado.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Si les digo que está mal la traducción, pueden pensar que quiero "serruchar el piso" al traductor.

    If I tell them the translation is bad, they might think I'm trying to horn in on the translator['s job/ position/turf]. Quitarle o minarle el terreno al traductor.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------
     

    cubaMania

    Senior Member
    Que yo sepa no tenemos equivalente en inglés para serruchar el piso. Me parece que lo mejor sería expresar en inglés los dos elementos: undermine someone in order to take their job.

    From Jerga de Panamá:
    serruchar el piso: tratar de hacer a un lado a alguien o quitarle lo que le pertenece. Pamela me anda serruchando el piso para quitarme el puesto en la oficina

    From dictionary.cambridge.org:
    If someone or something pulls the rug out (from under you), you are prevented from doing what you were going to do:
    If you change the terms for Social Security, you'll pull the rug out from under those who are now receiving benefits.
    Also from dictionary.cambridge.org:
    to interrupt or try to become involved in something when you are not welcome
    Julie is always trying to horn in on our conversations.
    And to undermine:
    to gradually weaken or destroy (someone or something), esp. in a way that is not obvious
    The incompetence and arrogance of the city's administration have undermined public confidence in government.
     

    Artrella

    Banned
    BA
    Spanish-Argentina
    Thank you Chaucer, I think your phrase is what I need, although Teacher taught me "pull the rug..", but I prefer "to horn in..." :thumbsup:

    Thanks CubaMania and Gringosimo! :thumbsup:
     
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