Servot

Juliet

New Member
Australia English
Could someone please tell me what Servot means in front of a persons name in the telephone directory. Thanks. :confused:
 
  • OlivierG

    Senior Member
    France / Français
    In French ? Never heard this term. Could you please provide an example?
    Are you sure it is not a compound name ?
    Something like :
    Servot-Durand Juliette +33 (0)1 23 45 67 89
    ?
     

    zippermonkeyboy

    Member
    United States-English
    I believe that ther person's name is a hyphenated name. Look at it. First name: Juliette, maiden name: Servot, husbands last name: Durand. This is a popular way to show people who the wife is without a lot of confusion. Young ladies that dream of marrying their ideal man oftentry to write their names in as many different forms as possible, i.e: Juliette Servot-Durand; Juliette Servot Durand, Juliette Durand; just for the few that I could come up with. There may be more, but then I have never had to think of this.
     

    beri

    Senior Member
    France
    makes me think of Servan-Schreiber, the world recordman of the shortest duration in a government (yes, he's ours!! :D)
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    zippermonkeyboy said:
    I believe that ther person's name is a hyphenated name. Look at it. First name: Juliette, maiden name: Servot, husbands last name: Durand. This is a popular way to show people who the wife is without a lot of confusion. Young ladies that dream of marrying their ideal man oftentry to write their names in as many different forms as possible, i.e: Juliette Servot-Durand; Juliette Servot Durand, Juliette Durand; just for the few that I could come up with. There may be more, but then I have never had to think of this.
    Except that this is an American custom, zipper, not a French one (or a British one for that matter). Juliette Servot-Durand will be the wife or daughter of a Monsieur Servot-Durand. Although at some stage in the past one of Monsieur Servot-Durand's ancestors must have changed the family name to recognize the dynastic union of two families, the compound name is then passed on to all the descendants. There will be M. Servot-Durand, Mme Servot-Durand, and all the little Servot-Durands. This is what is known in GB&I as a "double-barelled name" and tends to be thought of as rather "posh".

    F
     

    valerie

    Senior Member
    France, French & Spanish
    You're right Focalist, the main rule is that women change their family name when they marry. Nevertheless, it is now quite usual that a woman uses the combination of her own maiden name and her husband name when she marries, instead of changing name completely, especially in the working environment.
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    valerie said:
    You're right Focalist, the main rule is that women change their family name when they marry. Nevertheless, it is now quite usual that a woman uses the combination of her own maiden name and her husband name when she marries, instead of changing name completely, especially in the working environment.
    Ah, ça je ne le savais pas, valerie! One lives and one learns... :)

    In Britain it's more usual for a married woman who wants to keep her father's surname -- once again, especially in the working environment -- simply to keep it, tout court, without using her husband's surname at all.

    Tony Blair's wife, for example, (even though the media often tag her "Mrs Blair") chooses to be known as Cherie Booth.

    F
     

    beri

    Senior Member
    France
    valerie said:
    You're right Focalist, the main rule is that women change their family name when they marry. Nevertheless, it is now quite usual that a woman uses the combination of her own maiden name and her husband name when she marries, instead of changing name completely, especially in the working environment.

    never heard or saw that! how odd.
     
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