set off at a jog up one street and down another

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VicNicSor

Banned
Russian
down
If you go or look down something such as a road or river, you go or look along it. If you are down a road or river, you are somewhere along it.
They set off at a jog up one street and down another...
Collins Cobuild

Hello,

if "set off at a jog down a street" means "set off at a jog along a street, what does "set off at a jog up a street" mean, then ?
Thank you.
 
  • DW

    Banned
    Polish
    To me, They set off at a jog up one street and down another. means that they set off and jogged in two opposite directions, one direction first and the other one later. It probably refers to more than just two streets.
    ===
    [...]
    If "set off at a jog down a street" means "set off at a jog along a street, what does "set off at a jog up a street" mean, then? :arrow: In many cases set off down the street means the same as set off up the street.
    [...]
     
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    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    they set off and jogged in two opposite directions, one direction first and the other one later. It probably refers to more than just two streets.
    ===
    What do you mean by "jogged in two opposite directions"? The sentence tells about different streets: "up one street and down another". It doesn't tell that they were riding to and fro each street. Or have I misunderstood you?
     

    DW

    Banned
    Polish
    I'm not sure what you are getting at. I'm also not sure what to add to my previous comment on the problem.
     

    JustKate

    Senior Member
    DW is correct. Let's say the town has streets that run north and south that are numbered 1st Street, 2nd Street, etc. And let's say that the cross streets that run east and west are named after common trees - Maple, Pine, etc. If you "set off at a jog up one street and down another," you might jog north on 1st Street for a block or two, take Maple Street one block over to 2nd Street, and then jog south on 2nd Street. That's "jogging up one street and down another." In this case, up and down has nothing to do with compass directions - I used north, south, east and west just for the sake of convenience. All that up and down indicates is that you run one way on one street and run the opposite way on the next street over.
     
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    DW

    Banned
    Polish
    DW is correct. Let's say the town has streets that run north and south that are numbered 1st Street, 2nd Street, etc. And let's say that the cross streets that run east and west are named after common trees - Maple, Pine, etc. If you "set off at a jog up one street and down another," you might jog north on 1st Street for a block or two, take Maple Street one block over to 2nd Street, and then jog south on 2nd Street. That's "jogging up one street and down another." In this case, up and down has nothing to do with compass directions - I used north, south, east and west just for the sake of convenience. All that up and down indicate is that you run one way on one street and run the opposite way on the next street.
    :):thumbsup:
     
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