set/put your mind at ease

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dcx97

Banned
Hindi - India
Hello,

I just heard "I was just trying to set your mind at ease, that's all."

Shouldn't it have been "I was just trying to put your mind at ease, that's all."?

Here's the context (taken from the movie The Shawshank Redemption):

X: Sir, if I were ever to get out I would never mention what goes on in here. I'd be just as indictable as you for laundering that money.

Y: Don't you ever mention money to me again, you sorry son of a bitch. Not in this office, not anywhere.

X: I was just trying to set your mind at ease, that's all.

< Video link removed. Cagey, moderator >

Thanks!
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Both "put" and "set" are used.

    A Google search shows 221 results for "set" and 400 results for "put."

    From The Free Dictionary – notice the definitions and examples are virtually identical:

    set (one's) mind at ease
    To assuage or relieve one's worry, anxiety, dread, fear, etc.
    I know you're anxious to hear how your father is doing after the surgery, so let me set your mind at ease. He's going to make a full recovery.
    That bonus really set my mind at ease about these debts.


    put (one's) mind at ease
    To reduce or remove one's worry, anxiety, dread, fear, etc.
    I know you're anxious to hear how your father is doing after the surgery, so let me put your mind at ease—he's going to make a full recovery.
    That bonus really put my mind at ease about these debts.
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Any number of reasons. Perhaps “set” was more common in those days and in that place (1947, Portland, Maine), or he or she thought it sounded better coming from that particular character’s mouth, or he or she was more familiar with it, or some other reason entirely. I doubt that the scriptwriter checked Google or Ngrams for frequency. :)
     
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