... set real close together

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Gustav02

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
Hello! Can you please help me with a meaning of the sentence?


I remember the theatres on Broadway, and set real close together.


How can I take in the second part of the sentence: ... and set real close together?

Does that mean that the narrator remembers both theatres and set very well, by saying "real close together"?
 
  • lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    What is the source and context of this sentence, Gustav?

    I would say that "set" modifies "theatres," but it's hard to tell.
     

    Gustav02

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    What is the source and context of this sentence, Gustav?

    I would say that "set" modifies "theatres," but it's hard to tell.

    Thanks for your answer.

    here is a comprehensive context:

    I remember the theatres on Broadway, and set real close together. The curtains were made of this real heavy, dark red material. There were huge chandelier lights hanging from the ceiling. (and so on...)
     

    Gustav02

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    As Beryl says, you should give the source of the quotation.

    Is this it?
    http://lib.convdocs.org/docs/index-122986.html
    If so, your quotation is what you would get by choosing the wrong expressions to fill in the blanks.
    Yes, it is. Do you think that option of mine is wrong? To be honest, I chose that letter with the method of exception. But at the same time I do not quite understand the meaning of the second part of the sentence. Can you please tell me which one is correct then?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    You have answered 2A, but it's 2D, 3A.
    I remember the theaters on Broadway, which were so old and posh. The curtains were made of this real heavy, dark red material. There were huge chandelier lights hanging from the ceiling. The walls were dark, paneled wood. The seats were red and cushy and set real close together.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    When things (such as buildings or people or teacups) are "set close together" they are placed next to each other without much space between them.

    The theaters on Broadway might be 'set close together', but what makes that ending wrong is the word 'and'. It suggests that the subject of the verb 'set' is also the subject of another verb, but that shared subject with its verb is missing.

    Added: When you ask a question, you need to give complete context and background. You need to tell us where you found the sentence and what sort of writing it was, as Hildy1 did in post #5, and also to write out the answers you rejected, the ones Myridon refers to in the post above.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    It seems from Myridon's post 7 that there is quite a lot missing from the quote in your post 1, Gustav:(.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    Myridon has given the correct answer, and Cagey has explained why it should be that way.

    The original quote that was used for the multiple-choice question is probably this:

    I remember the theaters on Broadway were so old and plush. The curtains were made of this real heavy, dark red material with gold fringe and tassels. There were huge chandelier lights hanging from the ceiling. The walls were dark, paneled wood. The seats were red and cushy and set real close together.
    http://www.memoirsbyme.com/fm04.html
     

    Gustav02

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    Thanks all of you, guys:thumbsup:! I've sorted all that stuff out! I really got it:)

    P.S. If I have written anything wrong, please, correct me. That's quite important to me.
     
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