Set to flight

< Previous | Next >

october15

Senior Member
Portugal-Portuguese
Context:

The leaping rain was easing, following the storm front into the north, set to flight by bells.

(the bells of a church).

Is it the rain or the storm which is "set to flight"? Could the expression mean blown away, swept out?

october15
 
  • Unknoewn13

    Senior Member
    English - American
    I'd say it is the storm that is being "set to flight." The storm front is what's going north, and the rain is simply following that; thus, the storm is making the independent movement.

    I'm guessing that the phrase "set to flight by bells" is metaphorical, as if the church bells signify a time when there is not supposed to be rain, and thus the bells cause the rain to leave. I could be completely misinterpreting it, however. In this sense, "set to flight" would mean driven away or caused to go away.
     

    october15

    Senior Member
    Portugal-Portuguese
    That was more or less my interpretation. On a previous sentence the author refers the noise of the bells as louder than the rain and the thunder.
    So its very likely it would methaphorically "brush the rain away".

    Thanks.

    october15
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top