'seu' for 'your' or 'his'

Hello

When I ask my online Engish-Portuguese translator for the tradution of 'your problem', it gives 'seu problema'.

But I notice that it also gives the same result for 'his problem'.

So how do you guys make the difference between 'your problem' and 'his problem' ?

Would you rather say : 'problema de você' in order to make sure that you are talking about 'your problem', and make certain that the correspondent would not think that you are possibly talking about the problem of someone else ?
 
  • Denis555

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Seu problema = your(sing.&pl.) problem, his problem, her problem, their problem!

    That's a good question. But depending on the context it will be clear. Remember that in French the same happens for his/her problem! (=son problème)And in English your problem (of 1 person)/your problem(of more people).

    But we've come up with some solutions, very close to what you've suggested!;)

    So usually we say:
    problema dele = his problem,
    problema dela = her problem,
    problema deles = their problem,
    problema delas = their problem (only females).

    In that way, we've become very precise!:cool: Even more than French or English.
     
    So usually we say:
    problema dele = his problem,
    problema dela = her problem,
    problema deles = their problem,
    problema delas = their problem (only females).

    In that way, we've become very precise!:cool: Even more than French or English.
    Thanks, and how would you make certain that we are talking about your problems ?
     

    Denis555

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    Thanks, and how would you make certain that we are talking about your problems ?
    Because of what I said above, if we just say "seu(s) problema(s)" and it will be understood as "your problem(s)".
    Well, it is interesting that we don't say "problema de você" but we do say "problema de vocês" (and also vosso problema, in Portugal). And we can also use "teu, tua, teus, tuas" (in both countries)

    So recapping it:
    your problem = seu problema (but we can also say teu problema)
    your problem (pl; of more than 1 person) = problema de vocês (br)/ vosso problema (pt)
    his problem = problema dele
    her problem = problema dela
    Their problem = problema deles/delas
     

    coolbrowne

    Senior Member
    Português-BR/English-US bilingual
    Hi pkruger
    Thanks, and how would you make certain that we are talking about your problems ?
    More specifically, even though "seu(s) problema(s)" might correctly refer to his/her/their problem(s), in practice, native speakers hardly ever use that form, so it is safe to assume it is your problem(s).

    Regards
     

    Acoreano

    Member
    English - UK
    Is it not supposed to be o seu problema?

    Or is that only in Continental Portuguese? Is the "o/a/os/as" being dropped in CP as well nowadays?
     

    guihenning

    Senior Member
    Português do Brasil
    Is it not supposed to be o seu problema?

    Or is that only in Continental Portuguese? Is the "o/a/os/as" being dropped in CP as well nowadays?
    There are no fixed rules about that, but I guess the article is used or not regardless of the country.
    The tendency is: if the problem is known by both of the people involved, the speaker and the person he talks to, then the article is very likely to be used; but I don't think it's mandatory.
     

    xiskxisk

    Senior Member
    European Portuguese
    o meu problema - my problem
    o teu problema - your problem (singular)
    o seu problema - his/her problem
    o nosso problema - our problem
    o vosso problema - your problema (plural)
    o seu problema - their problem

    Please notice that we usually use the 3rd person instead of the 2nd with people we don't know well, so o seu problema also works for your problem.
    The actual 3rd person is also usually reformulated as deles (of them):

    o problema dele/dela - "the problem of him/her"
    o problema deles/delas - "the problem of them"
     

    Acoreano

    Member
    English - UK
    I guess the article is used or not regardless of the country.
    Thanks. Having the article in among possessives is very counter-intuitive to us English speakers, so if I can get away without it, I'm, going to.

    Would it be equally OK to say "em minha casa"?
     
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