shaping...the policy debates

NewAmerica

Senior Member
Mandarin
I understand "shaping the policies", but I don't understand "shaping...the policy debates." Does the latter mean "determining the direction of the policy debates??


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Studies by the Pew Research Center, titled “U.S. Public Wary of Biomedical Technologies to ‘Enhance’ Human Abilities” and “Automation in Everyday Life,” find striking wariness among Americans as they think about advances in robotics, artificial intelligence (AI) and biomedical innovations that could significantly alter human capabilities. Queried about different scientific and technological developments, more Americans say they are worried than say they are enthusiastic about six out of seven of these developments. This less-than-eager public outlook can play an important role in shaping adoption of the technologies and the policy debates that will govern their role in society.


-Scientific American

Source
 
  • VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    Does the latter mean "determining the direction of the policy debates??
    Sort of.
    It means that policy debates on this topic that will occur will consider and take into account the fact that the public is not very happy about those technological developments.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I don’t think shaping refers to the policy debates.

    This less-than-eager public outlook can
    play an important role in
    shaping adoption of the technologies and
    [in] the policy debates that will govern their role in society.
     

    bibliolept

    Senior Member
    AE, Español
    I don’t think shaping refers to the policy debates.
    This is a sensible reading — which makes the collocation of "shaping" and "adoption" all the more irksome to my ear. Yes, it's acceptable to say, even if it is awkward, that something "shapes" the adoption of a technology. I would just prefer words like "influence" as more idiomatic.

    Meanwhile, to "influence" a "debate" is deeply idiomatic, which makes the entire phrase slightly confusing, particularly if the writer didn't intend the reader to connect "shaping" with "debates."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    This is a sensible reading — which makes the collocation of "shaping" and "adoption" all the more irksome to my ear. Yes, it's acceptable to say, even if it is awkward, that something "shapes" the adoption of a technology. I would just prefer words like "influence" as more idiomatic.

    Meanwhile, to "influence" a "debate" is deeply idiomatic, which makes the entire phrase slightly confusing, particularly if the writer didn't intend the reader to connect "shaping" with "debates."
    :thumbsup::thumbsup:

    It's very difficult to tell if he intended it or not. I think not, also, but it shouldn't be that hard to know.
     

    NewAmerica

    Senior Member
    Mandarin
    This is a sensible reading — which makes the collocation of "shaping" and "adoption" all the more irksome to my ear. Yes, it's acceptable to say, even if it is awkward, that something "shapes" the adoption of a technology. I would just prefer words like "influence" as more idiomatic.

    Meanwhile, to "influence" a "debate" is deeply idiomatic, which makes the entire phrase slightly confusing, particularly if the writer didn't intend the reader to connect "shaping" with "debates."
    Cool.

    Thank you. :)
     
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