She always said to me how grateful she was that you always stood by her side and supported her so much.

lucylinguist

Senior Member
English - England
Hello,

Firstly, I'm sure this has been discussed already and I've just spent 40 minutes reading many interesting threads on the subject of reported speech, but I still don't feel completely certain of my sentence...
I am writing a letter of condolences to a man whose wife, physically handicapped for many years, has recently died.

I would like to write: "She always said to me how grateful she was that you always stood by her side and supported her so much."
(In English, the verbs in bold are obviously in the past tense because "she" (the wife) has died, so her feelings and the actions have stopped.)

My attempts in German:

1) present subjunctive:
"Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie sei, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehest und so sehr unterstützest.
(I am hoping this is OK and does not give the impression that she is still alive, and still thinking this even now).

2) past subjunctive:
"Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stündest und so sehr unterstütztest.
(This sounds wrong to me, because the start could mean "how thankful she would be"...)

3) combination of both tenses of subjunctive:
"Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie sei, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stündest und so sehr unterstütztest.
(This can't be right, surely! But somehow I find it more convincing than my 2nd attempt.)

In other threads I have heard mention of :
- Konjunktiv I (is this the translation of "present subjunctive"?) - the action really happened
- and Konjunktiv II (is this the translation of "past subjunctive"?) - the action is hypothetical

I suspect that my first attempt is correct, and the English term of "present" is what is confusing me.

Any help will be appreciated... and if possible, I do not want to change the sentence too much, because I have already written it in the card and just left blanks for the verbs!!!! I wasn't expecting this to be so difficult. Thanks!
 
Last edited:
  • elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I would say (using your template):

    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Yes, both could be used. “wäre” is what I would use naturally. I feel like “sei” conveys more distance from the statement and is less common colloquially.
     

    lucylinguist

    Senior Member
    English - England
    How interesting! So in fact, only the first verb needs to be in the subjunctive (present or past), and the other two are in the present indicative?!! I would never have guessed!
    Edit: Ah, probably because of "dass" which kind of makes what follows a new clause...
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    You could use Konjunktiv I for the whole lot ("sei" ... "stehest" ... "unterstützest") but I wouldn't. That would create a whole lot of journalist-style distance that I think would be jarringly out of place in this context.
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.
    :thumbsup:
    Or a with sei (reported speech) and würde + infinitive instead of Konjunktiv I / II:

    Sie sagte mir, wie dankbar sie sei, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehen und sie so sehr unterstützen würdest.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Can we use "sei" for an action that is meant to have happened in the past?
    What about "gewesen sei/wäre"?
    It’s “sei” because she would have said “bin” at the time of speaking. If she would have said “war” or “bin gewesen,” then you could use “sei...gewesen” in reported speech.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    You could use Konjunktiv I for the whole lot ("sei" ... "stehest" ... "unterstützest") but I wouldn't. That would create a whole lot of journalist-style distance that I think would be jarringly out of place in this context.
    Additionally this special form sounds very old-fashioned.
    If using Konjunktiv I would have build it with "würde" (I use the German word because it is not exactly the same as subjunctive, it is similar, however)


    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre/sei, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehen und sie so sehr unterstützen würdest.

    But I would prefer too:
    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt. (As Demiurg in #10.)
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    I suppose everybody agrees with elroy's version, but I have the feeling that lucylinguist considers it correct for a wrong reason. She says
    "So in fact, only the first verb needs to be in the subjunctive (present or past), and the other two are in the present indicative?!!
    Just to make sure you understand: it's not about putting one or more verbs in the subjunctive. The rule is applied to each verb independently:
    1st choice: Konjunktiv 1 -(sei / stehest"/unterstützest
    and if that's too formal (here it is),
    2nd choice Konjunktiv 2 -wäre/stündest/...?
    wäre is OK in informal language, the other two verbs are very uncommon in this form and sound strange
    3rd choice Indikativ or verb with "würde"
    Falls ich mich noch richtig an die Deutsch stunden erinnere. ...
     

    anahiseri

    Senior Member
    Spanish (Spain) and German (Germany)
    Perseas, German reported speech has a different logic from English R.Sp.
    The time sequence of the verbs is not taken into consideration, I mean,
    it doesn't matter if several past actions were not in the same past but before or later.
    I wonder if you understand what I mean, it's difficult to explain
     

    Perseas

    Senior Member
    It’s “sei” because she would have said “bin” at the time of speaking. If she would have said “war” or “bin gewesen,” then you could use “sei...gewesen” in reported speech.
    Even if I can understand that in the context of the reported speech, the following is even more difficult to understand given that the person who said that is dead. It seems my grammar has gone rusty and I have to brush it up. :)

    You can also use indicative for the whole sentence:

    Sie sagte mir, wie dankbar sie ist, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und sie so sehr unterstützt.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    The Indikativ works because it's what she would have actually said at the time.

    Think of it this way:

    You can choose to encode reported speech using Konjunktiv I or Konjunktiv II or a würde construction, but you don't have to.

    Er sagte mir, seine Schwester spricht Japanisch.
    Er sagte mir, seine Schwester spreche Japanisch.
    Er sagte mir, seine Schwester spräche Japanisch.
    Er sagte mir, seine Schwester würde Japanisch sprechen.


    All of these are okay!
     

    Demiurg

    Senior Member
    German
    Even if I can understand that in the context of the reported speech, the following is even more difficult to understand given that the person who said that is dead. It seems my grammar has gone rusty and I have to brush it up. :)
    Regarding indicative present: She said "Ich bin ihm dankbar". Hence you can rephrase it as "Sie sagte, sie ist ihm dankbar".

    (But I prefer "sei" or "wäre").

    Edit: crossed with elroy.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "Sie sagte, sie ist ihm dankbar."

    This always means that she said "Ich bin ihm dankbar" at the time of speaking, whether it was two minutes, two days, two months, two years, or twenty years ago. ;)
     

    lucylinguist

    Senior Member
    English - England
    This is a great thread! Thank you for all the input.
    Elroy and Anahiseri, your breakdowns and examples have really helped me to understand.
    Perseas: I'm glad I'm not the only one to find this confusing!

    So my final version is:
    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und sie so sehr unterstützt.

    :)


    (And for future occasions I will remember to practise on rough paper first, before writing in the actual card! :oops:)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    So my final version is:
    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und sie so sehr unterstützt.
    I'd use sei instead of wäre; there's no reason at all to use Konjunktiv II here, as the Konjunktiv I form is clearly distinguishable from indicative mood and secondly, you evidently don't have any doubt that the wife meant what she said.

    In German, you usually use Konjunktiv I for reported speech.
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    there's no reason at all to use Konjunktiv II here
    There is: it’s much more common in everyday German, and conveys less distance.

    Er sagte mir, er wäre/sei müde.
    Ich dachte, du wärest/seiest krank.


    These are far more common with “wäre(st),” in my experience
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    1 Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.
    2 Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie sei, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.
    3 Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie ist, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.


    All there versions are possible and idiomatic. In written German I would prefer 2 ("sei"), because this is the most typical and unmarked form for reported speech. This is also how real reports are written, e.g. in good journalism.

    In spoken German most people would say 3 without hesitation, if there is no doubt about the fact and the reported speech is not overly important. For condolences I might even use this to remove any doubt and just state it as a fact.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    How do you feel about it in practice, in everyday German (not in formal contexts or newspaper reports)?

    In casual conversation, which would convey more distance to you:
    a. “Josef sagte mir, er wäre krank.”
    b. “Josef sagte mir, er sei krank.”
     

    Piotr_WRF

    Senior Member
    Polish, German
    Regarding the first sentence, I'd subconsciously think that it isn't true:
    Josef sagte mir, er wäre krank, aber ich habe da so meine Zweifel.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Distance from the statement being reported (as in journalism).
    Why should "wäre" be less distant than "sei"?
    Because it's more colloquial/ less formal?

    All there versions are possible and idiomatic. In written German I would prefer 2 ("sei"), because this is the most typical and unmarked form for reported speech. This is also how real reports are written, e.g. in good journalism*.

    In spoken German most people would say 3 without hesitation, if there is no doubt about the fact and the reported speech is not overly important. For condolences I might even use this to remove any doubt and just state it as a fact.
    :thumbsup:
    *Not only in journalism.
    It's just "standard" for written German.
     
    Last edited:

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    In casual conversation, which would convey more distance to you:
    a. “Josef sagte mir, er wäre krank.”
    b. “Josef sagte mir, er sei krank.”
    Version a sounds like you don't believe him.

    Version b is neutral reported speech, but in everyday language it is marked as reported and distanced.

    c. “Josef sagte mir, er ist krank.”

    This is the default everyday version, not marked as reported/distanced/doubtful, but simply stating the fact.

    Not only in journalism.
    It's just "standard" for written German.
    Of course, yes. It is THE default and correct standard form.
     

    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    Version a sounds like you don't believe him.
    Really? I don't see this difference between "sei" and "wäre" here, and I think that "wäre" is wrong here.

    This discussion has already been described on Indirekte Rede – Wikipedia :
    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indirekte_Rede#Modus said:
    Oft ist der Konjunktiv I jedoch mit der Indikativform identisch, wodurch diese Relativierung nicht erkennbar würde. In diesen Fällen wird ersatzweise der Konjunktiv II benutzt.
    Auch wenn der Sprecher gegenüber der wiedergegebenen Aussage Zweifel hat oder sie für unzutreffend hält, kann der Konjunktiv II benutzt werden. Allerdings ist diese Regel umstritten.
     

    Şafak

    Senior Member
    Really? I don't see this difference between "sei" and "wäre" here, and I think that "wäre" is wrong here.

    Oft ist der Konjunktiv I jedoch mit der Indikativform identisch, wodurch diese Relativierung nicht erkennbar würde. In diesen Fällen wird ersatzweise der Konjunktiv II benutzt.
    Auch wenn der Sprecher gegenüber der wiedergegebenen Aussage Zweifel hat oder sie für unzutreffend hält, kann der Konjunktiv II benutzt werden. Allerdings ist diese Regel umstritten.


    I don't know if you'll find it interesting but the rule above repeats word for word the rule for reporting speech we non-native speakers learn by heart at schools and universities. Only later in life I learnt that other options, which elroy exhaustively described, were also viable.
     

    διαφορετικός

    Senior Member
    Swiss German - Switzerland
    Only later in life I learnt that other options, which elroy exhaustively described, were also viable.
    Other options are also described on that Wikipedia page, by the way.

    The thing I find interesting in the quotation from Wikipedia is that it contains a controversial rule, and that this controversy has shown up in our discussion thread. (Well, at least I myself "feel" the controversy.)
     

    Kajjo

    Senior Member
    Ich denke nicht, dass Wikipedia hier der entscheidende Maßstab ist. Leider bildet gerade das deutsche Wikipedia in solchen Themengebieten eher die Privatmeinung einzelner Möchtegernautoren ab und ist nicht ansatzweise maßgeblich. Es gibt hervorragende Artikel, aber auch sehr viel Theoriefindung.

    • Konjunktiv II kann einfach Ersatzform sein und neutral gemeint sein.
    • Konjunktiv II wird aber auch recht oft sehr bewusst eingesetzt, um Zweifel anzumelden.
    In der Alltagssprache verwenden sehr viele den Indikativ, wenn sie einfach nur die Tatsache berichten und es weder darauf ankommt, dass es indirekte Rede ist noch irgendeine Markierung erwünscht ist.

    Ich würde sogar soweit gehen, dass eine simple Aussage "Peter sagt, Sabine kommt auch gleich" von den meisten gar nicht als echte indirekte Rede wahrgenommen wird, sondern einfach als nüchterner Fakt, dass Sabine gleich kommt und ich das von Peter weiß. Nicht mehr und nicht weniger.

    Im gesprochenen Alltagsdeutsch wäre ein "Peter sagt, Sabine komme auch gleich" bereits deutlich markiert als indirekte Rede und mit neutraler Distanz zum Inhalt. Es mag sein, dass manche Sprecher, die besonders eloquente, gehobene Ausdrucksweise gewohnt sind, den Konj I als normaler empfinden als der Normalbürger. Ich beobachte im Alltag aber überwiegend den Indikativ, wenn keine Markierung beabsichtigt ist.

    Dagegen lässt ein "Peter sagt, Sabine käme gleich" schon deutliche Zweifel an der Tatsache erkennen, dass Sabine wirklich gleich kommen wird. Typische Erwartungshaltung wäre eher etwas wie "Peter sagt [zwar], Sabine käme gleich, aber ich glaube da noch nicht so recht dran / aber es wäre das erste Mal, dass sie pünktlich ist / aber man kann sich auf Sabine ja nie verlassen". Oder möglicherweise auch "aber was Peter sagt, ist ja nicht Maßstab der Dinge", also der Zweifel bezogen auf die Gesamtaussage.

    Ich beobachte nur recht selten die Verwendung von Konj II bei unmarkierter Wiedergabe einer Aussage.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Really? I don't see this difference between "sei" and "wäre" here, and I think that "wäre" is wrong here.

    This discussion has already been described on Indirekte Rede – Wikipedia :
    In dem Fall sind Indikativ und Konjunktiv I aber nicht identisch und damit ist die dies nicht anwendbar.
    Version a sounds like you don't believe him.
    Absolut! Wenn mir das
    Sie sagte mir immer, wie dankbar sie wäre, dass du ihr immer zur Seite stehst und so sehr unterstützt.
    jemand in einer Trauerkarte schreiben würde, würde ich das als unpassend, wenn nicht gar beleidigend empfinden.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I thought "wäre" was a happy medium between "ist" (which doesn't signal the reported speech in any way) and "sei" (which signals it too rigidly). I guess I was wrong.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I think I was misled because "wäre" is commonly used with "denken" isn't it? For example, "Ich dachte, er wäre krank." I guess that, in line with what you're all saying, the function of "wäre" here is precisely to highlight the fact that the assumption was wrong, right (I thought he was sick, but he isn't).
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    I guess that, in line with what you're all saying, the function of "wäre" here is precisely to highlight the fact that the assumption was wrong, right (I thought he was sick, but he isn't).
    I wouldn't say that the assumption is necessarily wrong but it's uncertain wether it's true.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    I think I was misled because "wäre" is commonly used with "denken" isn't it? For example, "Ich dachte, er wäre krank."
    Auch das ist laut Zwiebelfisch ein Irrtum:
    Zwiebelfisch:
    Zur Wiedergabe einer Vermutung oder Überzeugung hinter „denken“ und „glauben“ genügt der Konjunktiv I, egal in welcher Zeit:
    Er glaubt(e), er sei der tapferste Mann der Welt. (nicht: er wäre)
    Er hat geglaubt, er habe sich verhört. (nicht: er hätte)

    Dennoch tritt auch der Konjunktiv II gelegentlich in der indirekten Rede auf. Meistens dann, wenn der Konjunktiv I nicht deutlich genug ist:
    Man sagte ihnen, sie hätten keine andere Wahl. ( Weil zwischen „sie haben“ im Indikativ und „sie haben“ im Konjunktiv kein erkennbarer Unterschied besteht )
    [....] Wenn es trotzdem immer wieder geschieht, dass hinter „er dachte“ und „er glaubte“ ein „wäre“ oder „hätte“ auftaucht, dann liegt das daran, dass manche dem Konjunktiv I nicht recht trauen und zur deutlicheren Kenntlichmachung lieber gleich auf den Konjunktiv II zugreifen. Dies passiert häufig im Journalismus, wo es von großer Bedeutung ist, die wiedergegebene Rede von den eigenen Worten klar abzugrenzen.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    At least doubtful. If it were just uncertain I would definitely expect Konjunktiv I.
    Nicht so laut Zwiebelfisch:
    Frage eines Lesers aus Köln: Immer wieder lese oder höre ich Konstruktionen folgender Art: „Er dachte, es sei falsch“ oder „Er glaubte, es sei genug“. Muss es in solchen Fällen nicht „wäre“ heißen? Vor allem, wenn solche Annahmen sich als falsch erweisen, also irreal sind? Ist „sei“ nicht ein Wort, das ausschließlich in der indirekten Rede verwendet wird, wie bei „Er sagte, er sei müde“?
    [...]
    Wenn es um die Wiedergabe von Tatsachenbehauptungen geht, ist der Konjunktiv I gefragt. Und den kümmert es nicht im Geringsten, ob sich die Behauptung im Nachhinein als richtig oder falsch herausstellt.
    Mit dem Konjunktiv I lässt sich noch die offensichtlichste Lüge darstellen:
    Eva sagte, sie sei der Schlange nie begegnet.
    Der Baron behauptete, er habe sich selbst an den Haaren aus dem Sumpf gezogen
    .
    Ich bin mit Zwieblefisch einverstanden:
    the function of "wäre" here is precisely to highlight the fact that the assumption was wrong
    ist ein weit verbreiteter Irrtum. In keiner Grammatik kann man das ↑ nachlesen.
     
    Last edited:

    elroy

    Imperfect mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    dass manche dem Konjunktiv I nicht recht trauen
    Lustig! Aus meiner Erfahrung bezweifle ich, dass das etwas mit „Trauen“ zu tun hat. Der Konkunktiv I ist halt bekanntlich selten in der Alltagssprache, deshalb greift man mitunter auf den Konjunktiv II (wenn man nicht Indikativ verwendet).
     
    Top