She came screaming into the room vs She came into the room screaming

babai

Senior Member
bangla, bangoli
1. She came SCREAMING into the room.
2. She came into the room SCREAMING.
which one is correct grammatically? Why? Please explain.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    1. She came SCREAMING into the room.
    I would understand this as she came into the room at a very high speed.

    To scream has the meaning of "to travel at high speed" - its origins are probably related to the noise that tyres (or an engine) make when the vehicle swerves, or the sound of an object passing swiftly through the air.

    "I was walking along the road when a car passed me at about 150kph - this was followed by a police car screaming after it."
    "The eagle came screaming out of the sky, seized the lamb and flew off."

     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I prefer (1).

    She ran screaming into the room.
    She ran into the room, screaming with rage.


    I've never come across "scream" meaning "travel at high speed".
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I've never come across "scream" meaning "travel at high speed".
    Oh. A search for "screamed past me" will bring up a lot of examples. You are perhaps not familiar with such seminal works as Eternal Hell by Brandon Woodcock. For example:
    With a demonic childlike laugh the other demon child threw his stone, this time crashing only inches from my face. Moments later the rest of the demons threw their stones. I desperately struggled to get tip as the stones screamed past me in all directions.
    :D
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    'Stones screaming past' is a metaphorical use: the stones were going at such a speed that they seemed to make a screaming noise.

    I see absolutely no reason to interpret someone coming 'screaming' into a room in any other way than as someone coming into a room shouting in a high-pitched scream. If she had been out of doors, yours might have been a plausible interpretation.

    She came screaming into the room - she came into the room and she was screaming. I see nothing out of the ordinary or grammatically incorrect.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    'Stones screaming past' is a metaphorical use: the stones were going at such a speed that they seemed to make a screaming noise.
    Yes, I agree (see #3), but the reason that they "scream" is that they are travelling at high speed, hence the meaning. They do not actually make any noise: certainly not a scream.
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    I would understand this as she came into the room at a very high speed.

    To scream has the meaning of "to travel at high speed" - its origins are probably related to the noise that tyres (or an engine) make when the vehicle swerves, or the sound of an object passing swiftly through the air.

    "I was walking along the road when a car passed me at about 150kph - this was followed by a police car screaming after it."
    "The eagle came screaming out of the sky, seized the lamb and flew off."

    Then what should I consider below? I am still confused. please help me to clarify.
    1. She came SCREAMING into the room. Does 'screaming' means 'travel at high speed' here and in this case when it means 'travel at high speed', 'Screaming' used just next to the verbs?
    2. She came into the room SCREAMING. Does 'screaming' means 'makes a noise' here and in this case 'screaming' is used at last?
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    1. Yes. It will not work with -ing forms that have only one meaning: She came laughing into the room.:thumbsdown:

    2. Yes. She came into the room laughing. :tick: "laughing" is an adjective and the complement of "came". She came into the room [and she was] laughing. Compare "She came to the meeting drunk."
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Paul, how do you feel about "She came, laughing/screaming, into the room"?

    I just don't think those commas are essential.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I would have said that they were essential if what you mean is "She was laughing/screaming when she came into the room." but I don't think that "She came, laughing, into the room" is really idiomatic with or without commas. I don't think I'd say it.
    They cannot be used if you mean "She came into the room at a rate of knots."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think it's a lot of concepts mixed together.

    If something screams past you I think the ultimate source of the word scream is a sound. When the eagle screams down he's calling as he's diving. When a car screams past you it's ultimately a reference to the sound of the air flowing over the car and/or the engine generating a lot of noise. It could be a figurative reference if you don't hear the actual sound because I think the meaning of the sound generated by the speed, and the meaning of speed, have blended together over time. Something that goes at high speed generates a scream and something that is screaming must be going at high speed. You can pick your choice in the context of how to interpret it.

    In the case of "came screaming into the room", I think it indicates an actual scream, but it's also about the style of entrance. It's not the same as "came into the room screaming". That's only about the screaming and doesn't tell you about the entrance. I think "came screaming into the room" indicates an abrupt and unexpected entrance. The scream and the entrance are tied together. You're sitting there and the next thing you know someone bursts into the room while screaming. You get a double dose of surprise.

    For, "came into the room screaming" I think that doesn't necessarily indicate surprise. You could be having an argument with someone in the next room and they could react by "coming into the room screaming" in a way that is not at all surprising.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    I think that babai unwittingly chose an ambiguous example.

    Consider

    1. She came sweeping (adv.) into the room -> in a majestic manner

    2. She came into the room sweeping (adj.) -> and she was using a brush as she entered

    3. She came rushing into the room -> and she was rushing as she entered

    4. She came into the room rushing -> her entry need not be swift but her actions in the room were. -> She came into the room and she was in a hurry.
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    I think that babai unwittingly chose an ambiguous example.

    Consider

    1. She came sweeping (adv.) into the room -> in a majestic manner

    2. She came into the room sweeping (adj.) -> and she was using a brush as she entered

    3. She came rushing into the room -> and she was rushing as she entered

    4. She came into the room rushing -> her entry need not be swift but her actions in the room were. -> She came into the room and she was in a hurry.
    I understand the meanings of 3 and 4 but I don't understand the meanings of 1 and 2. Could you simplify them a little bit so that I could understand the difference of meanings between them?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In numbers 1 and 2, the word 'sweep' changes its meaning.
    In number 1, sweep means:

    17. to move or pass in a swift but stately manner:​
    Proudly, she swept from the room.
    From the second set of definitions on our definition page: WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    In number 2, sweep means:

    2. to clear or clean (a floor, room, chimney, etc.) of dirt, litter, or the like, by means of a broom or brush.​
    We understand them differently because of their position. In sentence 1, 'sweeping' is near the verb 'came' so we understand it as an adverb describing how she came. In sentence 2, is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as a describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.

    :arrow: Further discussion should focus on the original example. Introducing different examples raises new issues and is confusing.

    You will have to accept the fact that native speakers won't agree on the meaning of 'sweeping' in the original sentences. I am one of the people does not use 'screaming' to mean 'speeding.' Other native speakers do. You will have to make up your own mind as to how you want to use the word.
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    In numbers 1 and 2, the word 'sweep' changes its meaning.
    In number 1, sweep means:

    17. to move or pass in a swift but stately manner:​
    Proudly, she swept from the room.
    From the second set of definitions on our definition page: WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    In number 2, sweep means:

    2. to clear or clean (a floor, room, chimney, etc.) of dirt, litter, or the like, by means of a broom or brush.​
    We understand them differently because of their position. In sentence 1, 'sweeping' is near the verb 'came' so we understand it as an adverb describing how she came. In sentence 2, is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as a describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.

    :arrow: Further discussion should focus on the original example. Introducing different examples raises new issues and is confusing.

    You will have to accept the fact that native speakers won't agree on the meaning of 'sweeping' in the original sentences. I am one of the people does not use 'screaming' to mean 'speeding.' Other native speakers do. You will have to make up your own mind as to how you want to use the word.
    'In sentence 2, is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as a describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.' In this example here 'we understand it as a describing a different activity' Did you try to say 'an adjective' after the 'as'?
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    In sentence 2, is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as a describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.
    I apologize for the confusing mistakes in that sentence. :oops:

    It should be:
    In sentence 2, sweeping is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as [a] describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.​

    Does that make it clearer?
     

    babai

    Senior Member
    bangla, bangoli
    I apologize for the confusing mistakes in that sentence. :oops:

    It should be:
    In sentence 2, sweeping is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as [a] describing a different activity - sweeping the floor.​

    Does that make it clearer?
    No
    Should it be 'In sentence 2, sweeping is not near 'came' but at the end, and so we understand it as an adjective describing a different activity - sweeping the floor? I think you forgot writing 'Adjective' here.
    as you you have quoted in the thread #17 ' We understand them differently because of their position. In sentence 1, 'sweeping' is near the verb 'came' so we understand it as an adverb describing how she came.'
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    1. She came SCREAMING into the room.
    2. She came into the room SCREAMING.
    which one is correct grammatically? Why? Please explain.
    They're both correct.

    The word order has to do with the information that a speaker automatically thinks is more important.

    Which is more important? "into the room", the location she entered (she came into the room) or "screaming", which is what she was doing when she came into the room.

    Either way we look at it, both sentences are correct. One or the other may sound better or more familiar to some people. However, I consider that this is rather subjective, not objective.
     

    london calling

    Senior Member
    UK English
    I have no problem with either. As far as I'm concerned the word order is merely a question of emphasis.

    And it would never have occurred to me that she entered the room on a motorbike or in a car. Had the sentence been ...into the garage, ...onto the forecourt, ....into the car park I might have thought twice about the meaning.
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    I agree, london calling.

    And another question comes to mind:

    Would you think twice about this sentence? "She came into the screaming room."

    This means that the room is screaming or that it is a "screaming room", which is a room for screaming and, in which case, it would make perfect sense for her to come into the room screaming because that's what the room is for: screaming.

    Maybe, she just left the whispering room and wanted a change of pace.

    Then, again, it could mean that the room itself is screaming, in which case it's better to close the door. There's no need to add to the screaming with people constantly entering the room screaming -- themselves.


    :D :idea:
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    which one is correct grammatically?
    They're both grammatical, and without further context, mean much the same. There could be slight nuances of meaning but I don't know if that's what you're asking about.
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Hello babai,

    In my opinion, the standard option is #2, putting the adverb at the end of the entire concept of entering the room.

    Occasionally we might put the adverb immediately behind the verb as in #1. This is done either to call special attention to the adverb (as for example in poetry where the author is trying to create an immediacy of impressions in the reader’s mind) or, in the case of certain adverbs that might apply in more than one way, to distinguish one meaning from the other. You’ve been given some examples already—sweeping, and screaming for some speakers.

    So you can stick with #2 for the most part.

    Hope it helps.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I can think of lots of examples that can't go at the end.

    She came bustling into the room. (Often said of a maid.)

    The boy came bounding into the room.

    The frog came hopping into the garage.

    His entire team came bursting into his hospital room.*

    There is nothing unusual about option 1 in my mind and it sounds like it will make a more effective sentence much of the time in a narrative where it's likely to be used.

    * His entire team came into his hospital room bursting.

    They're going to need a lot more doctors.:D
     
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    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    That's very good, kentix.

    Yes, they'll need a lot more doctors.

    :D

    Those are good examples, as well. With further analysis, I would say that we may be able to come up with a reason that those words don't work in both parts of the sentence in the same way that "screaming" does. Maybe, I'll come back to this one later.

    :idea:
     

    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Okay, fair enough kentix. The difference is, when you are describing a particular way of [verb]ing, vs. a general state of being. So if the adverb applies to the verb alone, it comes right after the verb. But if it applies to the subject in general, it comes at the end. “Screaming” in the original example #1 is actually an adjective.
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    That's the real question, isn't it? What function is "screaming" performing in that context?

    The word "screaming", in the example sentence, is an "activity word". When "screaming" comes at the end of the sentence, it tells us the activity she was involved in, or the activity she was doing, when she came into the room.

    When "screaming" comes after the verb "came", we understand this to be figurative.

    She came screaming into the room. Figurative - She was not really screaming. We can say that she came into the room in such a way that it called to mind "screaming".

    When "screaming" comes at the end of the sentence, this tells us what she was doing. This is the literal sense. This is to say she was really screaming upon entering the room.

    She came into the room screaming. Literal - She was really screaming when she came into the room. Screaming is the action she was involved in, or the activity she was doing, when she came into the room. And "screaming" is an activity word.

    ______________________

    All of the words that end with ing in these example sentences are "activity words".

    When they come at the end of the sentence, they're taken literally.

    When they come after the verb, then they are understood figuratively.

    ______________________

    If we replace the ing word in each of the following sentences with "flying", then we can notice a difference. When "flying" comes after the action that the subject does in each sentence, this is taken figuratively. However, when "flying" comes at the end of the sentence, then this is taken literally. This accounts for the comical effect created by placing "bursting" at the end of the third sentence, which is what kentix did in a previous post. This gives us the image of each member of the team literally bursting, which kentix then followed with the idea that they would need a lot more doctors.

    1) The boy came bounding into the room.

    1B) The boy came flying into the room. Figurative - This could be figurative for "at a brisk pace" or "running".

    1C) The boy came into the room flying. Literal - And this sounds strange because we don't fly. Only birds fly.

    2) The frog came hopping into the garage.

    2A) The frog came flying into the garage. Figurative - This means that the frog was jumping forward very quickly or very fast.

    2B) The frog came into the garage flying. Literal - This can also have somewhat of a comical effect because frogs don't fly.

    3) His entire team came bursting into his hospital room.

    3A) His entire team came flying into his hospital room. Figurative - Here, "flying" can also be taken to mean fast, quickly, or at a brisk pace.

    3B) His entire team came into his hospital room flying. Literal - This has the same comical effect as placing "bursting" at the end of the sentence because, at the end of the sentence, we get the idea that both "bursting" and "flying" are meant in a literal way. And, of course, members of the team don't burst, and they don't fly.

    In sentence number one, if we keep the word "bounding" and place it at the end of the sentence, we get the same effect. Bounding is taken figuratively after the verb in the example sentence. It doesn't seem that we would want to take "bounding" literally. So placing "bounding" at the end of the sentence seems strange, or it makes for a strange sentence.

    In sentence number two, if we keep the word "hopping" and place it at the end of the sentence, it seems that we do not get the same effect. Hopping is taken literally after the verb and at the end of the sentence. And it doesn't seem that we would want to place "hopping" at the end of the sentence, anyway. Or, maybe, we do. What do we all think about placing "hopping" at the end of sentence number two?
     
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    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    The boy came running into the room.

    The boy came into the room running.

    This is similar to one of the previous example sentences.

    The frog came hopping into the room.

    The frog came into the room hopping.

    Here's how they are similar:

    Running is an action that a boy really can do. Therefore, there is no way to understand this in a figurative way.

    Hopping is an action that a frog really can do. Therefore, there's no way to understand this in a figurative way.

    In the other example sentences, we can understand that an ing word (activity word) that comes after a verb that a subject does is taken figuratively.

    We can think of other sentences that match the same pattern. When an ing word comes after a verb that a subject does, then we could find that this ing word can be understood figuratively.

    However, not all ing words that come after a verb that a subject does can be understood figuratively. Such ing words cannot be taken figuratively if they are activities that a subject can really do.

    In consideration of this last point, and using the same grammatical pattern represented by the original example sentence, we may find placing the ing word, "activity word", at the end of the sentence questionable. To be clear, this is only questionable when an ing word, "activity word", represents an action that a subject can really do and therefore cannot be taken figuratively.
     
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    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    1. She came SCREAMING into the room.
    2. She came into the room SCREAMING.
    which one is correct grammatically? Why? Please explain.

    Simply put, they're both grammatically correct.

    Vocabulary words we choose affect how we perceive a particular grammatical pattern or structure.

    Again, they're both correct. It's just that we perceive each one in a different way.

    To provide an explanation, and therefore a better answer, we have to look at other sentences that use the same grammatical pattern as your example sentences.

    This causes some discussion.

    It's also rather thought-provoking and therefore causes some analysis.

    Any English language learner grammar book that I have seen does not account for these particular grammatical patterns. This is not the first time that I have noticed or recognized this. This is rather noteworthy, I would say. We have to ask why we don't find these particular grammatical patterns in English language learner grammar books. I would say it's probably because there's not an easily recognizable and consistent way of explaining these particular grammatical patterns and accounting for these particular grammatical patterns. So they just leave them out. Or they don't think about them.
     
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    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I think that babai unwittingly chose an ambiguous example.

    Consider

    1. She came sweeping (adv.) into the room -> in a majestic manner

    2. She came into the room sweeping (adj.) -> and she was using a brush as she entered

    3. She came rushing into the room -> and she was rushing as she entered

    4. She came into the room rushing -> her entry need not be swift but her actions in the room were. -> She came into the room and she was in a hurry.
    To be fair here, whereas #1 and #3 stand alone, #2 and #4 are not natural-sounding as they are. In my experience there were would generally be some extra words of clarification to fully ground the descriptive word as a separate activity:

    She came into the room sweeping the floor with a brand new broom.

    She came into the room rushing about, her apron strings fluttering behind her.
    (Or, she came into the room in a hurry).

    You see, language is an act of approximation at times even for native speakers. We do our best to speak and be understood in spite of the potential ambiguities.

    Well, I think babai has plenty of ideas to sort through now! Hope it was helpful.
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    There's one more thing that comes to mind:

    When the activity, or ing word, is to be taken figuratively, we can't place it at the end of the sentence. When the activity, or ing word, is figurative, it seems that it must come immediately after the action that the subject does. When the activity, or ing word, is separated from the action that the subject does, then the figurative meaning of the activity, ing word, is not strong enough to withstand being separated from the action that the subject does. And then we end up getting the literal meaning of the activity, or ing word, which can make for a comical or a strange sentence.

    This, I believe, accounts for all the questioning of the word order, or the order of information, in the grammatical pattern represented by the first example sentence and all the other example sentences that come after.

    If we test this with other sentences that use the same grammatical pattern, I believe we will find the same result.

    So does anyone have any other examples of sentences that use the same grammatical pattern? With a few more example sentences, we can really put this idea to the test.

    :rolleyes: :idea: :eek:
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    She walked into the room dying of thirst.

    This is different, not the same idea, because "dying of thirst" is a phrase. It's not just an ing word or an "activity word", meaning it's not just one word. Therefore, it's not the exact same grammatical pattern we've been using for this topic. And it's not the same grammatical pattern as the original example sentence (and the examples that follow).


    She walked into the room dying of thirst.

    If we place "dying of thirst" after "walked", the action the subject does, then we would set it off with commas because it's additional information and it breaks up the flow of the sentence. Normally, or usually, a prepositional phrase follows the verb (Or a prepositional phrase follows a verb and its object. There's no object in this sentence, however.).

    She walked, dying of thirst, into the room.

    This calls to mind other possibilities:

    1) Dying of thirst, she walked into the room.

    2) Into the room she walked dying of thirst.

    Notice that, in sentence number 2, "dying of thirst" goes after "walked", the action the subject does, without any problem and without the need for a comma. This is because it does not interrupt the natural flow of the sentence.

    Also, the same variations for the order of information do not seem to be possible if we only use an ing word, or "activity word", instead of a phrase, which is more than one word, like "dying of thirst".

    So, while this is an interesting and good example, it's not really the same thing we've been discussing here.
     
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    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    Here it is with just "dying". We don't normally think of "dying" as figurative. If nothing else is included with "dying" to cause us to understand that it's figurative, then we can understand that something about the context, other information, can cause us to understand that "dying" is figurative. Here, there's nothing about "dying" that is figurative without the prepositional phrase "of thirst".

    She walked into the room dying. < This is possible. And we understand "dying" for what "dying" means.

    She walked dying into the room. < Speaking strictly of structure, this sentence is okay. However, it does not make sense to place "dying" after walk. There's no reason to believe or understand that "dying" is figurative.

    She walked into the room dying. < On her last breath after having returned from a shootout

    She walked into the room dying. And then, on her last breath, she fell to the floor.
     
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    pachanga7

    Senior Member
    English - US
    The point I was trying to make in post #33 is that we don’t often put a single activity word at the end of the phrase. In literary speech we would elaborate, in casual speech we would restructure. If someone said or wrote “she walked into the room dying”, the listener/reader is going to be left with doubt as to the meaning until further context is given. We might restructure the phrase along the lines of “She was dying when she walked into the room”. Even there, she could have been dying of embarrassment. Either way, dying and walking don’t seem to match, so it’s more of a semantic issue that the pared down grammar doesn’t on its own resolve.

    So while my example may not match precisely, it is naturalistic and shows the challenge of pinning down whether something is meant literally or figuratively or any other way, without context. In fact, we don’t know exactly how the original text was meant.

    I have a bias in that I think the main goal of our conversation is to help the English language learner make sense of language they are being exposed to, so that they may hope to recognize likely meanings and produce well-formed phrases of their own. I think we’ve gone well beyond that here so I’m going to respectfully say my adieus.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    To be fair here, whereas #1 and #3 stand alone, #2 and #4 are not natural-sounding as they are. In my experience there were would generally be some extra words of clarification
    Indeed, my entire point is that context is essential. :)
    #2 and #4 are not natural-sounding as they are.
    She came into the room drunk (adj.) -> She came into the room sweeping (adj.) :)
     

    Steven David

    Senior Member
    Standard General American English USA
    The point I was trying to make in post #33 is that we don’t often put a single activity word at the end of the phrase. In literary speech we would elaborate, in casual speech we would restructure. If someone said or wrote “she walked into the room dying”, the listener/reader is going to be left with doubt as to the meaning until further context is given. We might restructure the phrase along the lines of “She was dying when she walked into the room”. Even there, she could have been dying of embarrassment. Either way, dying and walking don’t seem to match, so it’s more of a semantic issue that the pared down grammar doesn’t on its own resolve.

    So while my example may not match precisely, it is naturalistic and shows the challenge of pinning down whether something is meant literally or figuratively or any other way, without context. In fact, we don’t know exactly how the original text was meant.

    I have a bias in that I think the main goal of our conversation is to help the English language learner make sense of language they are being exposed to, so that they may hope to recognize likely meanings and produce well-formed phrases of their own. I think we’ve gone well beyond that here so I’m going to respectfully say my adieus.

    I see your point, pachanga7. And I agree with what you say about helping the English learner -- or the original poster, @babai.

    :thumbsup: :)

    However, I happened to have come up with a few more examples that can illustrate what I posted before about the activity word, ing word, coming after the verb versus the activity word, ing word, coming at the end of the sentence. It's more to take in, and there's already much to take in here. However, I believe that these additional examples, using the same grammatical pattern as the original example sentences, can help to do just what you say in your last post: "recognize likely meanings and produce well-formed phrases of their own".

    Here are a few more examples:

    1A) The words came shooting out of his mouth. < Figurative - Words cannot shoot, and no one can shoot words. Here, we understand "shooting" to mean "rapidly and without interruption".

    1B) The words came out of his mouth shooting. < This does not make sense if we place "shooting" at the end of the sentence because it causes us to understand "shooting" in a literal way. (refer to kentix's example with "bursting" and a couple others)

    2A) The wind went howling down the street. < Figurative - The wind makes a howling sound, but the wind itself does not howl. Here, we understand "howling" as a word we use to describe the sound of the wind. In fact, only animals like wolves howl. So "howling" is figurative here.

    2B) The wind went down the street howling. < Literal - This sounds like the wind is some sort of creature that can howl, or it causes us to believe the wind is capable of howling, which is not the same thing as creating a sound that is similar to "howling".

    3A) The fire went sweeping through the forest. < Figurative - Here, we understand "sweeping" to mean "fast and covering lots of terrain". Fires do not sweep.

    3B) The fire went through the forest sweeping. < Literal - This causes us to think that the fire was really sweeping. Fires do not sweep. So this does not make sense. We can call it "correct in a structural way", but, for the meaning, it's not logical or not realistic.

    4A) The car went bolting down the slippery wet road (and spun out of control). < Figurative - Cars don't bolt, so this is figurative. Here, we understand "bolting" to mean fast.

    4B) The car went down the slippery wet road bolting. < Literal - This does not make sense because cars cannot bolt. Bolting only makes sense here in a figurative way -- or figuratively.

    For the figurative sense of "bolting", here's an example that comes up as the first result for this search in quotations: "car went bolting".

    Stephen King - 2016 - ‎Fiction - A police car went bolting past them, but so far as Rob could tell, they were still ahead of the other ambos and fire trucks.

    Note that, in the above examples, placing the activity word, the ing word, at the end of the sentences causes the sentences to lose their figurative meaning: we do not get a figurative meaning when an activity word, ing word, is placed at the end of a sentence.

    So I can wrap this up by referring to the original example sentences.

    Y) She came screaming into the room. < Figurative - Here, we understand that, maybe, she came into the room in such a way that it caused us to think of this as "screaming" or caused us, or the writer, to liken it to "screaming".

    Z) She came into the room screaming. < Literal - This works and makes sense in a literal way, or with the real meaning of "screaming", because it's possible for her to scream. People can really scream.

    However, note that by placing "screaming" at the end of the sentence, "screaming" does not have a figurative meaning. But because people can really scream, the sentence makes sense.

    I would conclude that, in using this particular grammatical pattern, if we want an ing word, an activity word, to take on a figurative meaning, we have to place the ing word, activity word, immediately after the verb. Separating an ing word, activity word, from the verb, causes the ing word, activity word, to lose its figurative meaning. The figurative idea is not strong enough to sustain itself when separated from the subject and the verb with this particular grammatical pattern: subject - verb -activity word (ing word) - location prepositional phrase.
     
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