She did not really want to sit, poked in a corner by the fire

longxianchen

Senior Member
chinese
Hi,
Here are some words from the novel Lady Chatterley's Lover(para. 34) by Lawrence(the University of Adelaide,here):
She obeyed him. He had that curious kind of protective authority she obeyed at once. So she sat and warmed her hands at the blaze, and droppedlogs on the fire, whilst outside he was hammering again. She did not really want to sit, poked in a corner by the fire; she would rather have watched from the door, but she was being looked after, so she had to submit.

Is "poked" a predicate or a non-predicate? And what does it mean please? I think "poked" is used to describe the way she sit. I rewrite it as: she didn't really want to sit like being poked in the corner by the fir. But I'm not sure.

Thank you in advance
 
Last edited:
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    It does not describe the way she was sitting. It suggests more that she was thrust or pushed into that position. Although this could mean that she was forced into a confined space, this is not what it means in this passage, but rather that he was forcing her to sit in that particular place and not somewhere else. There are different grammar theories of "predicate", and I don't know which version you are using.
     

    longxianchen

    Senior Member
    chinese
    Thank you
    There are different grammar theories of "predicate", and I don't know which version you are using.
    Let me show you how we define "predicate" and "non-predicate" in China.
    He likes(predicate) English literature
    He likes the sleeping(non-predicate) boy
    Seeing(non-predicate) the cat, the rat ran away.
    It does not describe the way she was sitting. It suggests more that she was thrust or pushed into that position. Although this could mean that she was forced into a confined space, this is not what it means in this passage, but rather that he was forcing her to sit in that particular place and not somewhere else.
    Does "poked in a corner by the fire" act as an adverbial of reason(the adverbial explains why she didn't want to sit)?
     

    se16teddy

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Does "poked in a corner by the fire" act as an adverbial of reason(the adverbial explains why she didn't want to sit)?
    Despite the comma, I don't think so. She was sitting against her will in a corner out of the way where she couldn't see, and she didn't like it. She was like a small object that you push (poke) into a crevice with your finger.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    In that case it's non-predicate.
    No, it doesn't explain why she didn't want to sit, because in fact she did want to sit, just not in that place.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top