she {do/does}

albertovidal

Senior Member
Spanish, Argentina
Many time I've heard (mostly in US tv series) people using do instead of does for the third person of the singular.
I don't know if, in informal speaking, this is currently used.
Here an example ("Criminal Minds" tv series) of a dialogue:
-Peter, tell Susan that she has to work overnight for the next 3 days.
-Boss, you know it'll be hard to convince 'er 'cause she has 3 children to look after.
-Well, if she do it she'll an extra pay.

By the way, I've also heard "touch/clinch/go" instead of (touches/clinches/goes):confused:
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    There are many forms of English in which verbs do not change form.
    I eat
    you eat
    he eat
    we eat
    they eat
    ... and so on.

    There is a grammatical term for this... someone else may be able to provide it :)
     

    alekscooper

    Member
    Russian
    I know that African-Americans very often say things like 'he don't'. I really love 50 Cent for all his grammatical deviations.
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    'If she do it' is simply non-standard - probably a southern English regional dialect form.
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    There are many forms of English in which verbs do not change form.
    I eat
    you eat
    he eat
    we eat
    they eat
    ... and so on.

    There is a grammatical term for this... someone else may be able to provide it :)
    When/Where would you ever find 'he eat' (other than in the Deep South of the USA perhaps)?
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    When/Where would you ever find 'he eat' (other than in the Deep South of the USA perhaps)?
    In African American Vernacular English (AAVE). The following is from page 116 of Differentiated Instruction: A Guide for Elementary School Teachers by Amy Benjamin:

    ...AAVE distinguishes between present action which is going on now (He eat) and habitual action (He be eating).
    This use of the verb be is not a feature of dialects of the Southern US, other than in the case of AAVE itself.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I was simply pointing out that there are variants of English, dialects if you wish, that do not inflect verbs for third person singular.
    It's an observation based on comments in previous threads here.
    Others will know more precisely where these are prevalent.
     

    manon33

    Senior Member
    English - England (Yorkshire)
    In African American Vernacular English (AAVE). The following is from page 116 of Differentiated Instruction: A Guide for Elementary School Teachers by Amy Benjamin:



    This use of the verb be is not a feature of dialects of the Southern US, other than in AAVE itself.
    I was indeed referring to the AE of African Americans as represented in novels set in Alabama and other places in the 'Deep South', such as 'To Kill a Mockingbird'.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Many time I've heard (mostly in US tv series) people using do instead of does for the third person of the singular.
    I don't know if, in informal speaking, this is currently used.
    Here an example ("Criminal Minds" tv series) of a dialogue:
    -Peter, tell Susan that she has to work overnight for the next 3 days.
    -Boss, you know it'll be hard to convince 'er 'cause she has 3 children to look after.
    -Well, if she do it she'll an extra pay.

    By the way, I've also heard "touch/clinch/go" instead of (touches/clinches/goes):confused:
    However, as far as I know, the grammatical rule states that it should be "he eats"
    Standard English inflects the third person singular: I eat, he eats.
    But there are many non-standard varieties of English which do not inflect the third person singular, as panj says.



    I grew up in an area where it was common to hear I do eat, he do eat instead of
    I eat, he eats:).
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    Loob: I appreciate your answer and comments.
    By the way, is there any book you can recommend me about "non-standard varieties of English which do not inflect the third person singular"
    Thabks in advance
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    I wouldn't waste any time searching for such a book, Albert.

    Life's too short.

    Rover
    That mainly depends on how far you wanna go with your knowledges!:D
    Moreover, I'm only 66 and if science keeps moving forward this fast, maybe I can celebrate my 100th anniversary. By that time you'll be celebrating your 106's. Happy birthday!
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    If you read English: history, diversity, and change by David Graddol et al. (1996), there's a section on p. 227 on differences in verb forms (see here).

    Standard English is listed with the pattern: I love, you love, he/she/it loves, etc.

    South-west England is listed with the invariant verb pattern: I loves, you loves, he/she/it loves, etc.

    And East Anglia is listed with the invariant verb pattern: I love, you love, he/she/it love, etc.
     

    alekscooper

    Member
    Russian
    >>South-west England is listed with the invariant verb pattern: I loves, you loves, he/she/it loves, etc.

    Wow, that's cool! Yesterday a student of mine (she's a beginner) asked me if 'I drinks' was correct and I told her it wasn't. I just didn't know she spoke South-West English! :) :)
     

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    Ok. I've read all the posts and I see that there are variants depending on locations where English is spoken.
    Now, I heard something that was not explained in this thread.
    A police officer is trying lo locate a criminal. He goes to a gas station, where supposedly the criminal had filled his car's tank and asks the girl behind the counter "Do that camera works?" (in this phrase, "do" instead of "does" but "work" instead of "works"). Is this also acceptable?:confused:
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I've heard "Do that camera work?" in non-standard varieties of English, but never "Do that camera works?". That sounds like a non-native-speaker error to me.

    Is this also acceptable?:confused:
    Just a PS. You need to beware of thinking that all the variants discussed in this thread are "acceptable", if by that you mean "generally acceptable".

    Things which are correct in one variety of English may be completely incorrect in another variety.
     
    Last edited:

    albertovidal

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Argentina
    I've heard "Do that camera work?" in non-standard varieties of English, but never "Do that camera works?". That sounds like a non-native-speaker error to me.


    Just a PS. You need to beware of thinking that all the variants discussed in this thread are "acceptable", if by that you mean "generally acceptable".

    Things which are correct in one variety of English may be completely incorrect in another variety.
    Therefore, Standard English Grammar makes no sense?:confused:
    The phrase "do that camera works" is from tv series "breaking bad"
     

    mplsray

    Senior Member
    Therefore, Standard English Grammar makes no sense?:confused:
    The phrase "do that camera works" is from tv series "breaking bad"
    There is no one Standard English Grammar. There are several standard dialects of English, each one of which has its own grammatical peculiarities. The standard dialects share much grammar, but they share much grammar with nonstandard dialects as well.

    I do not recognize "Do that camera works?" as belonging to a nonstandard dialect with which I am familiar. However, keep in mind that (1) the writer may have misunderstood the rules of a real nonstandard dialect, (2) the writer may have created a fictional nonstandard dialect, (3) the usage may be one which belongs to an actual nonstandard dialect but one which I have not encountered before this, or (4) the writer may have intended the speaker to represent a nonnative speaker, and thus the speech does not represent nonstandard usage but represents mere error.
     
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