She had a lump stuck in her throat

keramus

Senior Member
Persian
Jane was very upset because her dad passed away.She was about to cry but she prevented herself crying. She spoke as if she had a lump stuck in her throat.
She was talking with difficulty because she was about to burst into tears and something was stuck in her throat.

Here is my question:
Is this sentence idiomatic in English:
She is talking as if a lump is stuck in her throat.


Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Close, the English version is "She spoke as if she had with a lump stuck in her throat."
    or
    "She started/tried to speak but the words stuck in her throat."

    To have something a lump (usually, of food) stuck in your throat is to be understood literally... you start to choke.
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If I were describing something I witnessed I would probably say "she sounded / she spoke as if she had a lump in her throat." An omniscient narrator could say "she spoke with a lump in her throat."
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    An omniscient narrator could say "she spoke with a lump in her throat."
    I don't think this is a BE construction, but no omniscience is required as it can be heard. It is relatively common: A touching example from “Whiplash” by Kathleen Strelow (AE)
    “Mickey,” she spoke with a lump in her throat. “I don’t want us to be bitter. I don’t want to be without you in my life.”
    “I don’t want that either.”
     
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