She has been married

user_gary

Banned
India - Hindi
She has been married to her husband for 10 years.

I thought `married' was a `main verb' in this sentence.

Now, someone told, it is a `adjective'.

So, I am being confused.

Could you help me on this?
 
  • panjandrum

    Occasional Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    In this sentence, married looks part of the verb form "she has been married" - just like "she has been painted" - it looks like a passive verb (though the concept of passive, married and woman in the same sentence troubles me).

    Of course, married can also be an adjective - she is a married woman - so I suppose it looks like an adjective as well.

    I think you need a grammar expert.
     
    Who told you that, user_gary?

    I dare not call myself a grammar expert, but in your sentence, user_gary, "married" certainly isn't an adjective. As panjandrum correctly noticed, it's a passive construction, and "married" is the main verb, while "has" and "been" -- "been" being the appropriate form of the verb "to be", by means of which passive voice is created -- are auxiliary verbs.
     

    teentitans

    Banned
    USA
    Filipino/American English
    She has been married to her husband for 10 years.

    I thought `married' was a `main verb' in this sentence.

    Now, someone told, it is a `adjective'.

    So, I am being confused.

    Could you help me on this?
    She -subject of the sentence/Pronoun type
    has been - linking verb
    married - main verb --> adjective


    From a student's perspective. :)


    <<Delete promotional text>>
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I'd agree: a past participle acting as an adjective.

    If it were a passive construction, you'd be able to contemplate putting a "by" in there somewhere:

    Elizabeth Taylor has been married 8 times.

    (Sorry if I've got the number of Miss Taylor's marriages wrong....)

    Loob
     
    Grammar expert would say it is a present perfect sentence where `married' is an `adjective'.
    I'm wondering what grammar expert would say 'married' is an adjective in the sentence?

    It's a verb, not an adjective; of that I'm 99% sure. I'm mulling over the sentence being passive. This might not be a common practice, but couldn't you say 'She's been married by Jim' for instance?
     

    I_like_my_TV

    Senior Member
    Tongan
    In the sentence in question, "married" is the verb in past participle form. Of course, this form can function as an adjective elsewhere, but this function does not erase its origin as a verb.
     

    I_like_my_TV

    Senior Member
    Tongan
    By the way, in a similar way (present participle in this case), "living" in "I've been living here for the past 10 years" cannot be said to be an adjective.

    However, in "I'm married", "married" is an adjective, just as "dead" in "I'm dead".
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    in "I'm married", "married" is an adjective, just as "dead" in "I'm dead".
    I agree that the past participle is acting as an adjective in "I'm married". It's also acting as an adjective in "I've been married for 10 years":)

    Comparing "married" and "dead" (for illustrative purposes only!):

    adjectival uses:

    She's been married for 10 years
    She's been dead for 10 years

    passive constructions

    She's been married in 3 different churches
    She's been killed in 3 different films

    Does this help, user_gary?

    Loob
     

    user_gary

    Banned
    India - Hindi
    Dick is married now.
    He was married in Chicago in June.
    Therefore, he has been married since June.


    I think, in the first sentence, the word `married' is an adjective.

    I think, in the second sentence, the word `married' is a verb. (it is a passive sentence)

    I think, in the third sentence, the word `married' is an adjective.

    Please, tell me, I am right or wrong.
     

    mimiluau

    Senior Member
    USA
    English-UK
    Actually you're wrong. In all the sentences "married" is a verb

    In the first sentence, Dick is married... is the present tense of the verb with the infinitive: "To be married" e.g. I am married, You are married, He is married etc.

    The 2nd sentence also uses "married" as verb not bcos of the passive voice, but because it's a conjugation in the past tense of the verb "To be married."

    The 3rd sentence "married" is also a verb because it is the present perfect tense conjugagion of the verb "to be married."

    "Married" as an adjective would be like Dick and Jane are a married couple. This is because in this case married is a describing/modifying the noun i.e. couple. An adjective is a word that modifies or describes the noun.
     

    kenny4528

    Senior Member
    Mandarin, Taiwan
    I think this topic has been discussed many times.
    It looks like that everyone explains this sentence in different perspectives.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    User_gary, I agree with elroy that your post number 14 is right.

    As regards what mimiluau says, no-one is denying that "married" is a past participle ie a verb form. It's the job it does that we're focusing on, though.

    In "Dick and Jane are married" the past participle 'married' is acting as an adjective, just as it is in "Dick and Jane are a married couple" (compare
    "Dick and Jane are young"/"Dick and Jane are a young couple").

    In "Dick and Jane were married in that church" the past participle "married" is acting as part of a passive verb.

    Loob
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Dick is married now.http://forum.wordreference.com/announcement.php?f=6&a=42
    He was married in Chicago in June.
    Therefore, he has been married since June.

    I think, in the first sentence, the word `married' is an adjective.
    I think, in the second sentence, the word `married' is a verb. (it is a passive sentence)
    I think, in the third sentence, the word `married' is an adjective.
    You are right on all counts.
    User_gary, I agree with elroy that your post number 14 is right.
    Please add me to the list of those who agree that user_gary has it right.

    Let's test this by substituting other adjectives and verbs in the three sentences.

    Dick is married now. Dick is happy now. Dick is healty now.
    This is a past participle functioning as an adjective.

    He was married in Chicago in June. He was executed in Chicago in June. He was applauded in Chicago in June.
    This is a verbal use in a passive sentence in all three examples.

    Therefore, he has been married since June. Therefore, he has been mystified since June.
    Therefore, he has been satisfied since June.

    All of the past participles function as adjectives in the examples above.
     

    my-own-fantasy

    Senior Member
    English-USA
    I can understand why that would be an adjective. For example if I said
    "He's married"
    Then the verb is be to be and the adjective would be married because it describes the person.
     
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