She has Silver

Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

Coco is not my student, but she's a regular participant at my English Corner (a place where people practice English). Also a few of her classmates go to the English Corner with her. In the past few months, Coco always got the highest scores of her English tests but she used to perform not that well in her test. Let's say she always scored 145 (top score 150) these times while she got 130 before. Then her classmates were wondering how she could improve her English, then someone (her classmate) who knew me said:

She has Silver.

The "someone" wanted to say that "Because with the help of Silver, Coco got such high scores. Coco's English has improved greatly."

I wonder if it's natural to say so.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Her remark would have made a little more sense if she had said: She has Silver for a teacher. Of course, "Silver" would be an unusual name in English. "For a teacher" would help make it clearer that she was talking about a person whose name was "Silver". Even then, a fluent English-speaker could find that confusing unless he knew that "Silver" referred to you and not the metal.
     

    Sun14

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Her remark would have made a little more sense if she had said: She has Silver for a teacher. Of course, "Silver" would be an unusual name in English. "For a teacher" would help make it clearer that she was talking about a person whose name was "Silver". Even then, a fluent English-speaker could find that confusing unless he knew that "Silver" referred to you and not the metal.
    Is it idoamtic to say she has Silver as a teacher?
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I suppose the person who said "She has Silver" used Silverobama's real name, which he replaced with Silver in this thread. Let's say it was John. I think, considering the context and situation, "She has John" would be quite understandable.

    Then her classmates were wondering how she had could improved her English,
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    It seems idiomatic to me to say that a person has another person, when attributing their success to that other person's help.

    I managed to find an example (not easy to search for this!)

    Interview | | Bryan Thomas Schmidt - Author and Editor

    "Jane Yellowrock is a shapeshifting skinwalker you don’t want to cross—especially if you’re one of the undead…
    ...But now, someone is out to take [Leo's] place as Master Vampire of the city of New Orleans, and is not afraid to go through Jane to do it. After an attack that’s tantamount to a war declaration, Leo knows his rival is both powerful and vicious, but Leo’s not about to run scared. After all, he has Jane. "

    In this quotation, Leo the master vampire is able to be less afraid of rivals trying to steal his place, because he has Jane's help.
     
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