She hasn't said boo!

Andrew___

Senior Member
Hi guys, in English there is a phrase "She hasn't said boo!" which means that she hasn't said a word, she has kept silent etc.

For context, imagine the following conversation:

"Has Samira responded to your invitation?"
"No, she hasn't said boo, and it's now been 2 weeks."


My attempts are:

MSA:
لم تقل شيئا
لم تقل أي كلمة
لم ترد بعد

Egyptian:
ma 2aalitsh walla kilma khaaaaaaaliS!

Iraqi:
ma qaalit/kaalit walla shi
 
  • Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    in Iraq it's gaalet (I know, it's confusing, somethimes they say the qaaf, sometimes it's k and others it's g, in the case of قال, it's always g excpet in Mousil).

    I have a note though for both the EA and IA, you actually said: she didn't say nothing, when you mean she didn't say anything! so basically what you said is that she said everything or something! It should be ma 2aalitsh(i) 7aaga and ma gaalet shi.

    However, many Arabs actually do say that (although not all), especially when stressing, because they mean "ma gaalet la itha chanat jaya wala shi" the part in italics is dropped and it leaves a double negation which is wrong actually! I usually tease people when they say something like that by replying "ya3ni gaalet shi?" :)

    I also wanted to say something regarding the English version; she hasn't said boo. In Iraq, they may say something like "gaalet baw" بَوْ; baw is a word that means "be careful, danger", usually said to very young children. The phrase, however, means something very different in Iraq, it means "she said: beware, I might hurt you" - it's sort of an adiom. There is also "gaalet 3aw" (she barked = idiom for "she was rude, angry and/or scary") and "gaalet day" (she "popped in" then left quickly).

    I just thought this might be intersting to know.
     

    Andrew___

    Senior Member
    Thanks Maha for that.

    I also wanted to say something regarding the English version; she hasn't said boo. In Iraq, they may say something like "gaalet baw" بَوْ; baw is a word that means "be careful, danger", usually said to very young children.
    I am quite amazed to hear that. This is what "boo" means in English too. It is used most of the time in the context of scaring children, for example if someone hides and then comes out and startles the child.
     

    yasmeena

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Lebanon)
    Thanks Awatoufa. What does this literally mean? "She did not utter in a girl lip"? :D What is going on here?
    بنت شفة 'a lip's daughter' which is 'a word' (lips give birth to words). So the expression means : she did not utter a word.
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    Does this work in Iraqi Arabic? (assuming we change the pronounciation to "ma gaalat brimm")
    I've never heard it before; but it may be used in the Southwest (lower Furaat) if it's common in Saudi.

    Anyway, if I heard it in a sentence for the first time I think I would get the gist even though I haven't heard it before.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    I just thought of something you can say in Palestinian Arabic: متخنفستش (matkhanfasatesh). I'd be interested in finding out whether this verb is used in other dialects.
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    In Egypt, el khanfasa has a totally different meaning. It's when someone dresses up in a strange style. This usage was "created" in the sixties with الخنافس (the Beatles) :)
     

    Mahaodeh

    Senior Member
    Arabic, PA and IA.
    I just thought of something you can say in Palestinian Arabic: متخنفستش (matkhanfasatesh). I'd be interested in finding out whether this verb is used in other dialects.
    Just a wild guess; it was originally متنفستش, but then some people added the khaa' for the fun of it and it became so common you can use it without anyone not understanding it's meaning! :)

    Well, I've seen things like that happen during my lifetime so I don't think it's too far fetched.
     

    yasmeena

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Lebanon)
    I just thought of something you can say in Palestinian Arabic: متخنفستش (matkhanfasatesh). I'd be interested in finding out whether this verb is used in other dialects.
    I've never heard anything close in Lebanon. The only خنفسة I can think of is the expression متل الخنفسة بالطاسة. :)
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English, Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Very interesting. So it seems to be specifically Palestinian.
    In Egypt, el khanfasa has a totally different meaning. It's when someone dresses up in a strange style. This usage was "created" in the sixties with الخنافس (the Beatles) :)
    So would you say "tkhanfas" to mean "he dressed that way"?
    Just a wild guess [...]
    I never thought about the etymology. You may be right! :)
    I've never heard anything close in Lebanon. The only خنفسة I can think of is the expression متل الخنفسة بالطاسة. :)
    What does that mean?
     

    yasmeena

    Senior Member
    Arabic (Lebanon)
    What does that mean?
    I think it is of a Syrian origin.

    متل الخنفسة بالطاسة
    الخنفسة هي الخنفساء، حشرة من القشريات، والطاسة هي كوب دائري المقطع واسع السطح قليل الارتفاع، والمثل يرمز لمن يكثر من الحركة دون طائل ولا فائدة، مثل الخنفسة إذا وضعت في الطاسة تقضي عمرها في حركات اعتباطية سريعة دون أن تتمكن من الخروج.
     
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