she/her resigning

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bantu

Senior Member
India - Hindi & English
My complaint resulted in she/her resigning.

What could be the difference in meaning and sense?
And either seems like grammatically correct.
 
  • Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    She is wrong. Either: (a) the preposition "in" takes the accusative personal pronoun "her", or; (b) "resigning" is a noun (= resignation) and needs the possessive pronoun "her".

    In both cases, "her" :tick:.
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    Although she is the subject of the gerund-participle 'resigning', the usual subject form 'she' cannot be used here. Both of the other two forms can, and both are common: 'me resigning' or 'my resigning', 'him resigning' or 'his resigning'. In the case of 'her' the two forms are the same.
     

    bantu

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    Although she is the subject of the gerund-participle 'resigning', the usual subject form 'she' cannot be used here. Both of the other two forms can, and both are common: 'me resigning' or 'my resigning', 'him resigning' or 'his resigning'. In the case of 'her' the two forms are the same.
    She is wrong. Either: (a) the preposition "in" takes the accusative personal pronoun "her", or; (b) "resigning" is a noun (= resignation) and needs the possessive pronoun "her".

    In both cases, "her" :tick:.
    Now, this has to be settled with respect to strictest rules (and not colloquial usage).
    Besides, what happens when we use: "Ben resigning" or "Ben's resigning"?
    Furthermore, what is the sense like: 'her resigning' as one word/unit or 'her, resigning'?
    [Hope you get it]
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Now, this has to be settled with respect to strictest rules...
    No it doesn't because, fortunately, "her" is the correct answer in either case. Ben has nothing to do with it (unless you're intending to start a new thread about Ben resigning).

    But that old gerund/ive argument already has far too many threads devoted to it - just use the search button and you'll see.
     

    bantu

    Senior Member
    India - Hindi & English
    No it doesn't because, fortunately, "her" is the correct answer in either case. Ben has nothing to do with it (unless you're intending to start a new thread about Ben resigning).

    But that old gerund/ive argument already has far too many threads devoted to it - just use the search button and you'll see.
    Mr. Bradford, sir, in fact we can have a separate thread for 'me resigning', 'my resigning', or 'I resigning' too.
    What say, entangledbank?
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Go ahead, all I'm saying is that in this case 'she' is quite wrong, as would be 'I' 'they' or 'we'. There is no reason at all for a personal pronoun in the nominative case to be used here.
     
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